Advertisement

Topics

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Arteriovenous Malformations: Long-Term Outcomes and Late Effects.

08:00 EDT 16th May 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Arteriovenous Malformations: Long-Term Outcomes and Late Effects."

Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is an accepted treatment option that has been performed for more than 40 years. The goal of AVM GKRS is nidus obliteration to eliminate the risk of intracranial hemorrhage while minimizing the risk of short- and long-term adverse radiation effects (ARE). Nidus obliteration typically occurs between 1 and 5 years after GKRS. The most important factor associated with nidus obliteration is the prescribed radiation dose. The chance of obliteration ranges from 60 to 70% for margin doses of 15-16 Gy to 90% or more for margin doses of 20-25 Gy. Neurologic decline after GKRS can occur from either hemorrhage or ARE. Numerous studies have shown that the risk of AVM bleeding is either unchanged or decreased following GKRS. Advances in neuroimaging and dose-planning software have reduced the incidence of early ARE to <4%. Volume-staged procedures can be safely performed for large-volume AVM that were previously considered too large for GKRS. Late ARE (generally cyst formation) are common in patients who develop early MRI imaging changes (areas of high T2 signal) after GKRS, but most cases can be managed with either observation or resection of the thrombosed AVM.

Affiliation

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Progress in neurological surgery
ISSN: 1662-3924
Pages: 238-247

Links

DeepDyve research library

PubMed Articles [11692 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Long-term efficacy and tolerability of gamma knife radiosurgery for growth hormone-secreting adenoma: A retrospective multi-center study (MERGE-001).

Little is known about the long-term efficacy, prognostic factors and tolerability of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for acromegaly. The aim of this study is to investigate long-term hormonal effects, ...

The NASSAU (New ASSessment of cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations yet Unruptured) Analysis: Are the Results From The ARUBA Trial Also Applicable to Unruptured Arteriovenous Malformations Deemed Suitable for Gamma Knife Surgery?

The optimal management of unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is controversial after the ARUBA trial.

Efficacy and safety of Gamma knife radiosurgery for meningiomas in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2: A long-term follow-up single center study.

To explore the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) for meningiomas in neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients .

Impact of pretreatment growth on Tumor control for vestibular schwannomas following gamma knife.

To determine if volumetric growth prior to gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery predicts long-term tumor control.

Long-Term Tumor Control Rates Following Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuroma.

Clinical Trials [8747 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Essential Tremor

The purpose of this study is to examine effects (good and bad) of gamma knife radiosurgery for essential tremor. The gamma knife places a small lesion in the brain to suppress tremors.

Protocol for Staged Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large Arteriovenous Malformations

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a well established treatment option for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The potential complications related to radiosurgery are well documented and are pre...

Early Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery to Residual Tumor After Surgery of Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Gamma GBM is a single-arm phase II trial that prospectively measures the progression-free survival time after addition of an early gamma knife boost to areas of residual tumor to standard-...

Cognitive Outcome After Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in Patients With Brain Metastases (CAR-Study A)

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly applied in patients with brain metastases (BM) and is expected to have less adverse effects on cognitive functioning than Whole Brain Radiat...

Study of Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Spectroscopy for Recurrent Glioma

The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy, of treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma using Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery (GKS) to target a tumor volume defined by a combination...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Abnormal formation of blood vessels that shunt arterial blood directly into veins without passing through the CAPILLARIES. They usually are crooked, dilated, and with thick vessel walls. A common type is the congenital arteriovenous fistula. The lack of blood flow and oxygen in the capillaries can lead to tissue damage in the affected areas.

A congenital disorder that is characterized by a triad of capillary malformations (HEMANGIOMA), venous malformations (ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA), and soft tissue or bony hypertrophy of the limb. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the VG5Q gene which encodes a strong angiogenesis stimulator.

A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.

Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.

A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.

Advertisement
Quick Search
Advertisement
Advertisement

 


DeepDyve research library

Relevant Topic

Radiology
Radiology is the branch of medicine that studies imaging of the body; X-ray (basic, angiography, barium swallows), ultrasound, MRI, CT and PET. These imaging techniques can be used to diagnose, but also to treat a range of conditions, by allowing visuali...


Searches Linking to this Article