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NPWT: a gate of hope for patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

08:00 EDT 27th June 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "NPWT: a gate of hope for patients with diabetic foot ulcers."

Non-healing diabetic foot ulcers are a common and costly complication of type 2 diabetes and can result in lower extremity amputation. This case study concerns a 51-year-old man with a 17-year history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. He had developed a deep ulcer to the calcaneus of his left foot, which was 12x7 cm in size and infected with multi-drug-resistant . He was admitted to hospital for the non-healing diabetic foot ulcer and uncontrollable fever and was a candidate for amputation. He was treated with wound irrigation and debridement as well as negative-pressure wound therapy and antibiotic treatment. This strategy was effective and the wound size reduced progressively. The patient recovered well. Medical and wound care teams who deal with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers can benefit from a strategy of combination therapy.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
ISSN: 0966-0461
Pages: S6-S9

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.

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Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.

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