Topics

Lessons on Doctoring from Where There Is No Doctor.

08:00 EDT 8th August 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Lessons on Doctoring from Where There Is No Doctor."

No Summary Available

Affiliation

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: The American journal of medicine
ISSN: 1555-7162
Pages:

Links

DeepDyve research library

PubMed Articles [677 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Monitoring My Journey From Doctor, to Patient, to Doctor With Lived Experience.

Doctoring and Deportation.

The Performance Art of Student Doctoring.

Influence of doctor-patient conversations on behaviours of patients presenting to primary care with new or persistent symptoms: a video observation study.

Most cancers are diagnosed following contact with primary care. Patients diagnosed with cancer often see their doctor multiple times with potentially relevant symptoms before being referred to see a s...

Diagnosis and Monitoring of Acute Infections with Emphasis on the Novel Biomarker Human Neutrophil Lipocalin.

Acute infections affect all of us at least once or twice a year. Sometimes the infection prompts a visit to our doctor, and the question asked by the patient and the doctor is whether the infection sh...

Clinical Trials [1029 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

A Participatory Parental Intervention Promoting Physical Activity in Preschools

The aim of this study is to test whether a parent-focused participatory intervention in addition to gym lessons can enhance preschoolers physical activity compared to gym lessons alone.

Are Character Building Lessons Effective in Decreasing Bullying Behaviors?

Through the use of an educational intervention, the object of this study is to reduce the prevalence of bullying behaviors among fifth grade school age children. Bullying behaviors promot...

Clinical Trial Comparing Two Health Education Programs for Obese Patients (HEPO-TRIAL)

Clinical trial comparing two health education programs for obese patients in order to achieve a substantial and beneficial weight loss, using mediterranean diet. Patients will be allocated...

Sport Injuries During Physical Activity Lessons in Secondary School in South of Reunion Island

TsColEPS aims at identifying individual determinants of sport injuries during physical activity lessons in secondary school at reunion Island.

A Study of the Effect of Patient Education (Talking Health Together) in Improving Doctor-patient Communication

This study is being carried out to see if patients make the lifestyle changes or take their medication as instructed by their doctor during their visit as a result of the T.H.T. patient-ed...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.

Experiential, attitudinal, emotional, or behavioral phenomena occurring during the course of treatment. They apply to the patient or therapist (i.e., nurse, doctor, etc.) individually or to their interaction. (American Psychological Association: Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)

Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.

Boxes in which physicians kept their drugs and other medications, medical instruments and supplies, manuals, etc. As a carrying case or convenient storage receptacle, or a kind of portable pharmacy, the medicine chest was indispensable to the itinerant physician. The chest was usually larger and sturdier than a doctor's kit or bag.

An intermediate stage between polytheism and monotheism, which assumes a "Great Spirit", with lesser deities subordinated. With the beginnings of shamanism there was the advent of the medicine man or witch doctor, who assumed a supervisory relation to disease and its cure. Formally, shamanism is a religion of Ural-Altaic peoples of Northern Asia and Europe, characterized by the belief that the unseen world of gods, demons, ancestral spirits is responsive only to shamans. The Indians of North and South America entertain religious practices similar to the Ural-Altaic shamanism. The word shaman comes from the Tungusic (Manchuria and Siberia) saman, meaning Buddhist monk. The shaman handles disease almost entirely by psychotherapeutic means; he frightens away the demons of disease by assuming a terrifying mien. (From Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p22; from Webster, 3d ed)

Quick Search


DeepDyve research library

Searches Linking to this Article