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CHEST COMPRESSION COMPONENTS (RATE, DEPTH, CHEST WALL RECOIL AND LEANING): A SCOPING REVIEW.

08:00 EDT 16th September 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "CHEST COMPRESSION COMPONENTS (RATE, DEPTH, CHEST WALL RECOIL AND LEANING): A SCOPING REVIEW."

To understand whether the science to date has focused on single or multiple chest compression components and identify the evidence related to chest compression components to determine the need for a full systematic review.

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Resuscitation
ISSN: 1873-1570
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