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Inflammatory Tinea Capitis Mimicking Erosive Pustulosis of the Scalp.

07:00 EST 4th November 2019 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Inflammatory Tinea Capitis Mimicking Erosive Pustulosis of the Scalp."

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Acta medica portuguesa
ISSN: 1646-0758
Pages: 733

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A general term describing various dermatophytoses. Specific types include TINEA CAPITIS (ringworm of the scalp), TINEA FAVOSA (of scalp and skin), TINEA PEDIS (athlete's foot), and tinea unguium (see ONYCHOMYCOSIS, ringworm of the nails). (Dorland, 27th ed)

Ringworm of the scalp caused by species of Microsporum and Trichophyton, which may occasionally involve the eyebrows and eyelashes. (Dorland, 27th ed)

A mitosporic Oxygenales fungal genus causing various diseases of the skin and hair. The species Microsporum canis produces TINEA CAPITIS and tinea corporis, which usually are acquired from domestic cats and dogs. Teleomorphs includes Arthroderma (Nannizzia). (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th edition, p305)

Skin diseases involving the SCALP.

A microscopically inflammatory, usually reversible, patchy hair loss occurring in sharply defined areas and usually involving the beard or scalp. (Dorland, 27th ed)

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