Topics

Influenza increases invasive meningococcal disease risk in temperate countries.

07:00 EST 11th January 2020 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Influenza increases invasive meningococcal disease risk in temperate countries."

Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a severe bacterial infection that displays wintertime seasonality in temperate countries. Mechanisms driving seasonality are poorly understood and may include environmental conditions and/or respiratory virus infections. We evaluated the contribution of influenza and environmental conditions to IMD risk, using standardized methodology, across multiple geographical regions.

Affiliation

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
ISSN: 1469-0691
Pages:

Links

DeepDyve research library

PubMed Articles [31734 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Prevention and control of meningococcal disease: updates from the Global Meningococcal Initiative in Eastern Europe.

The Global Meningococcal Initiative (GMI) aims to prevent invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) worldwide through education, research and cooperation. In March 2019, a GMI meeting was held with a multi...

The epidemiological signature of influenza B virus and its B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages in the 21st century.

We describe the epidemiological characteristics, pattern of circulation, and geographical distribution of influenza B viruses and its lineages using data from the Global Influenza B Study. We included...

Variable clinical presentation by the main capsular groups causing invasive meningococcal disease in England.

Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) typically presents as meningitis, septicaemia or both. Atypical clinical presentations are rare but well-described. We aimed to assess the relationship between men...

UKMenCar4: A cross-sectional survey of asymptomatic meningococcal carriage amongst UK adolescents at a period of low invasive meningococcal disease incidence.

Carriage of , the meningococcus, is a prerequisite for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), a potentially devastating infection that disproportionately afflicts infants and children. Humans are the s...

Meningococcal invasive disease by serogroup W and use of ACWY conjugate vaccines as control strategy in Chile.

Serogroup causing invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) can change abruptly, as it occurred in Chile when serogroup predominance switched from MenB to MenW in 2012. As a response, a national vaccinatio...

Clinical Trials [16192 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Safety, Tolerability and Immunogenicity of Novartis Meningococcal B Recombinant Vaccine Administered to Healthy Adolescents According to Different Vaccination Schedules

The proposed study is aimed to assess the antibody response and short-term persistence of Novartis Meningococcal B Vaccine after one, two or three doses and to evaluate the optimal vaccina...

Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness in Tropical Africa

Influenza, a highly communicable acute respiratory disease, is one of the major infectious disease threats to the human population. In Africa, information on the occurrence of influenza an...

Safety and Immunogenicity in Dose-Ranging and Formulation-Finding Meningococcal B (MenB) Vaccine Study in 2-month-old Infants

This study is aimed at assessing the safety and immunogenicity of different doses and formulations of a new Novartis Meningococcal B Recombinant Vaccine.

Evaluation of Meningococcal C Vaccine Programmes in Canadian Children

The purpose of the study is to see which of the three current provincial Meningococcal C Conjugate vaccine schedules in Canada provide the longest lasting protection against Meningococcal...

Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis and Severe Influenza

Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) has been reported in critically ill patients with influenza infection with a highly variable incidence between 1 to 21%. Studies investigating IPA in...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.

Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.

Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.

The influenza outbreaks of 1918 to 1919 also known as Spanish flu pandemic. First reported in Haskell County in Kansas in March of 1918 the disease spread throughout the world and may have killed as many as 25 million people.

Strains of Neisseria meningitidis responsible for most outbreaks of meningococcal disease in Western Europe and the United States in the first half of the 20th century. They continue to be a major cause of disease in Asia and Africa, and especially localized epidemics in Sub-Sahara Africa.

Quick Search


DeepDyve research library

Relevant Topics

Infectious-diseases
Antiretroviral Therapy Clostridium Difficile Ebola HIV & AIDS Infectious Diseases Influenza Malaria Measles Sepsis Swine Flu Tropical Medicine Tuberculosis Infectious diseases are caused by pathogenic...

Respiratory
Asthma COPD Cystic Fibrosis Pneumonia Pulmonary Medicine Respiratory Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are any infection of the sinuses, throat, airways or lungs.  They're usually caused by viruses, but they can also ...

Public Health
Alternative Medicine Cleft Palate Complementary & Alternative Medicine Congenital Diseases Dentistry Ear Nose & Throat Food Safety Geriatrics Healthcare Hearing Medical Devices MRSA Muscular Dyst...


Searches Linking to this Article