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Complement evasion by the human respiratory tract pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis.

07:00 EST 13th February 2020 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Complement evasion by the human respiratory tract pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis."

All infective bacterial species need to conquer the innate immune system in order to colonize and survive in their hosts. The human respiratory pathogens Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are no exceptions, and have developed sophisticated mechanisms to evade complement-mediated killing. Both bacterial species carry lipooligosaccharides preventing complement attacks, and attract and utilize host complement regulators C4b binding protein and Factor H to inhibit the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation, respectively. In addition, the regulator of the terminal pathway of complement activation, vitronectin, is hijacked by both bacteria. An array of different outer membrane proteins in H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis simultaneously binds complement regulators, but also plasminogen. Several of the bacterial complement-binding proteins are important adhesins and contain highly conserved regions for interactions with the host. Thus, some of the outer membrane proteins are viable targets for new therapeutics, including vaccines aimed at preventing respiratory tract diseases such as otitis media in children and exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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This article was published in the following journal.

Name: FEBS letters
ISSN: 1873-3468
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