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Minimally invasive removal of retained subcutaneous ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter using an endoscopic vein harvesting system: A technical note.

08:00 EDT 18th March 2020 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Minimally invasive removal of retained subcutaneous ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter using an endoscopic vein harvesting system: A technical note."

and Importance: Retained old cerebrospinal fluid diversion shunt catheters in the neck, chest, or abdominal walls are frequently encountered in patients with lifelong shunt dependent hydrocephalus who underwent multiple shunt revisions. Particularly in cases where years and decades go between shunt revisions, the distal catheter portion can get calcified and nearly impossible to remove. Most patients tolerate a retained shunt catheter without problems. In some patients, however, retained catheters can cause pain and discomfort, particularly over the clavicle with head movements. Albeit trivial, we are unaware of innovative solutions to this problem. Here, we describe the use of an endoscopic vein harvest device used in cardiothoracic surgery to completely remove an old, calcified shunt catheter.

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Name: World neurosurgery
ISSN: 1878-8769
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