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PubMed Journal Database | Brain : a journal of neurology RSS

03:39 EDT 24th October 2017 | BioPortfolio

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Showing PubMed Articles 1–25 of 347 from Brain : a journal of neurology

Cross-cueing cannot explain unified control in split-brain patients.

TOR1A variants cause a severe arthrogryposis with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor.

Autosomal dominant torsion dystonia-1 is a disease with incomplete penetrance most often caused by an in-frame GAG deletion (p.Glu303del) in the endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein torsinA encoded by TOR1A. We report an association of the homozygous dominant disease-causing TOR1A p.Glu303del mutation, and a novel homozygous missense variant (p.Gly318Ser) with a severe arthrogryposis phenotype with developmental delay, strabismus and tremor in three unrelated Iranian families. All parents who were carriers...

Tourette syndrome: a disorder of the social decision-making network.

Tourette syndrome is a common neurodevelopmental disorder defined by characteristic involuntary movements, tics, with both motor and phonic components. Tourette syndrome is usually conceptualized as a basal ganglia disorder, with an emphasis on striatal dysfunction. While considerable evidence is consistent with these concepts, imaging data suggest diffuse functional and structural abnormalities in Tourette syndrome brain. Tourette syndrome exhibits features that are difficult to explain solely based on bas...

The cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: evaluating its role in cognitive decline.

The cerebellum has long been regarded as essential only for the coordination of voluntary motor activity and motor learning. Anatomical, clinical and neuroimaging studies have led to a paradigm shift in the understanding of the cerebellar role in nervous system function, demonstrating that the cerebellum appears integral also to the modulation of cognition and emotion. The search to understand the cerebellar contribution to cognitive processing has increased interest in exploring the role of the cerebellum ...

Less is more: neural mechanisms underlying anomia treatment in chronic aphasic patients.

Previous research with aphasic patients has shown that picture naming can be facilitated by concurrent phonemic cueing [e.g. initial phoneme(s) of the word that the patient is trying to retrieve], both as an immediate word retrieval technique, and when practiced repeatedly over time as a long-term anomia treatment. Here, to investigate the neural mechanisms supporting word retrieval, we adopted-for the first time-a functional magnetic resonance imaging task using the same naming procedure as it occurs durin...

Neuroinflammation and its relationship to changes in brain volume and white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

Brain magnetic resonance imaging is an important tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis patients. However, magnetic resonance imaging alone provides limited information for predicting an individual patient's disability progression. In part, this is because magnetic resonance imaging lacks sensitivity and specificity for detecting chronic diffuse and multi-focal inflammation mediated by activated microglia/macrophages. The aim of this study was to test for an association between 18 kDa tr...

Movement disorders with neuronal antibodies: syndromic approach, genetic parallels and pathophysiology.

Movement disorders are a prominent and common feature in many autoantibody-associated neurological diseases, a group of potentially treatable conditions that can mimic infectious, metabolic or neurodegenerative disease. Certain movement disorders are likely to associate with certain autoantibodies; for example, the characteristic dyskinesias, chorea and dystonia associated with NMDAR antibodies, stiff person spectrum disorders with GAD, glycine receptor, amphiphysin or DPPX antibodies, specific paroxysmal d...

Influence of cerebrovascular disease on brain networks in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease.

Network-sensitive neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize large-scale brain network degeneration in Alzheimer's disease and its prodrome. However, few studies have investigated the combined effect of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease on brain network degeneration. Our study sought to examine the intrinsic functional connectivity and structural covariance network changes in 235 prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. We focused p...

Cell-based therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis.

The availability of multiple disease-modifying medications with regulatory approval to treat multiple sclerosis illustrates the substantial progress made in therapy of the disease. However, all are only partially effective in preventing inflammatory tissue damage in the central nervous system and none directly promotes repair. Cell-based therapies, including immunoablation followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mesenchymal and related stem cell transplantation, pharmacologic manipu...

Seizure onset zone localization using postictal hypoperfusion detected by arterial spin labelling MRI.

Neurological dysfunction following epileptic seizures is a well-recognized phenomenon. Several potential mechanisms have been suggested to explain postictal dysfunction, with alteration in cerebral blood flow being one possibility. These vascular disturbances may be long lasting and localized to brain areas involved in seizure generation and propagation, as supported by both animal and human studies. Therefore, measuring perfusion changes in the postictal period may help localize the seizure onset zone. Art...

Progranulin: a new avenue towards the understanding and treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

Progranulin, a secreted glycoprotein, is encoded in humans by the single GRN gene. Progranulin consists of seven and a half, tandemly repeated, non-identical copies of the 12 cysteine granulin motif. Many cellular processes and diseases are associated with this unique pleiotropic factor that include, but are not limited to, embryogenesis, tumorigenesis, inflammation, wound repair, neurodegeneration and lysosome function. Haploinsufficiency caused by autosomal dominant mutations within the GRN gene leads to ...

Tau hyperphosphorylation induces oligomeric insulin accumulation and insulin resistance in neurons.

Insulin signalling deficiencies and insulin resistance have been directly linked to the progression of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. However, to date little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms or insulin state and distribution in the brain under pathological conditions. Here, we report that insulin is accumulated and retained as oligomers in hyperphosphorylated tau-bearing neurons in Alzheimer's disease and in several of the most prevalent human tauopathies. The intran...

Humanized mutant FUS drives progressive motor neuron degeneration without aggregation in 'FUSDelta14' knockin mice.

Mutations in FUS are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a dominant mode of inheritance. In trying to model FUS-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in mouse it is clear that FUS is dosage-sensitive and effects arise from overexpression per se in transgenic strains. Novel models are required that maintain physiological levels of FUS expression and that recapitulate the human disease-with progressive loss of motor neurons in heterozygous animals. Here, we describe a new humanized FUS-ALS mouse wi...

Voodoo surgery? The distinct challenges of functional neuroimaging in clinical neurology.

Pharmacological targeting of apelin impairs glioblastoma growth.

Glioblastoma are highly aggressive brain tumours that are associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Within these tumours exists a subpopulation of highly plastic self-renewing cancer cells that retain the ability to expand ex vivo as tumourspheres, induce tumour growth in mice, and have been implicated in radio- and chemo-resistance. Although their identity and fate are regulated by external cues emanating from endothelial cells, the nature of such signals remains unknown. Here, we used a mass spectromet...

Corrigendum.

Exome sequencing and network analysis identifies shared mechanisms underlying spinocerebellar ataxia.

The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias, referred to as spinocerebellar ataxias in genetic nomenclature, are a rare group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by loss of balance and coordination. Despite the identification of numerous disease genes, a substantial number of cases still remain without a genetic diagnosis. Here, we report five novel spinocerebellar ataxia genes, FAT2, PLD3, KIF26B, EP300, and FAT1, identified through a combination of exome sequencing in genetically undiag...

Genotype-phenotype correlation in ATAD3A deletions: not just of scientific relevance.

In vivo characterization of cortical and white matter neuroaxonal pathology in early multiple sclerosis.

Neuroaxonal pathology is a main determinant of disease progression in multiple sclerosis; however, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, including its link to inflammatory demyelination and temporal occurrence in the disease course are still unknown. We used ultra-high field (7 T), ultra-high gradient strength diffusion and T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging to characterize microstructural changes in myelin and neuroaxonal integrity in the cortex and white matter in early sta...

Reply: Genotype-phenotype correlation in ATAD3A deletions: not just of scientific relevance.

Reply: MRI findings of visual system alterations in Parkinson's disease.

A null mutation in MICU2 causes abnormal mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and a severe neurodevelopmental disorder.

Mitochondrial calcium homeostasis is a tightly controlled process that is required for a variety of cellular functions. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex plays a critical role in this process. MICU2 is a major component of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex and its deficiency has been shown to impair mitochondrial calcium [Ca2+]m homeostasis although the exact mechanism remains unclear. We used exome sequencing, positional mapping, and functional characterization of MICU2 deficiency to in...

Chemogenetic locus coeruleus activation restores reversal learning in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

Clinical evidence suggests that aberrant tau accumulation in the locus coeruleus and noradrenergic dysfunction may be a critical early step in Alzheimer's disease progression. Yet, an accurate preclinical model of these phenotypes that includes early pretangle tau accrual in the locus coeruleus, loss of locus coeruleus innervation and deficits locus coeruleus/norepinephrine modulated behaviours, does not exist, hampering the identification of underlying mechanisms and the development of locus coeruleus-base...

Reward deficits in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia include insensitivity to negative stimuli.

During reward processing individuals weigh positive and negative features of a stimulus to determine whether they will pursue or avoid it. Though patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia display changes in their pursuit of rewards, such as food, alcohol, money, and sex, the basis for these shifts is not clearly established. In particular, it is unknown whether patients' behaviour results from excessive focus on rewards, insensitivity to punishment, or to dysfunction in a particular stage of...

Clinical, pathological and functional characterization of riboflavin-responsive neuropathy.

Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome represents a phenotypic spectrum of motor, sensory, and cranial nerve neuropathy, often with ataxia, optic atrophy and respiratory problems leading to ventilator-dependence. Loss-of-function mutations in two riboflavin transporter genes, SLC52A2 and SLC52A3, have recently been linked to Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome. However, the genetic frequency, neuropathology and downstream consequences of riboflavin transporter mutations are unclear. By screening a large cohort of ...


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