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PubMed Journal Database | Infant mental health journal RSS

06:03 EDT 20th June 2019 | BioPortfolio

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Showing PubMed Articles 1–25 of 93 from Infant mental health journal

Infant mental health home visiting in the context of an infant-toddler court team: Changes in parental responsiveness and reflective functioning.

This article describes an infant-toddler court team in Michigan, the community-based participatory research approach to the implementation evaluation, and the resulting changes in parenting. Like other court teams, Michigan's Baby Court is led by a science-informed jurist, and all service providers are knowledgeable about the developmental needs of young children and engage in collaborative communication throughout the case. Relationship-based treatment in the form of infant mental health home-visiting was ...

Caregivers' emotional competence and behavioral responsiveness as correlates of early childcare workers' relationships with children in their care.

In the current study, we examined associations among early childcare workers' emotional competence, observed responsiveness, comfort with socioemotional teaching practices, and the quality of their relationships with children in their care. The participants were 100 early childcare workers (72 center-based Early Head Start teachers and 28 family childcare providers). Results showed that caregivers' emotion regulation ability was positively associated with caregiver-child relational closeness. Understanding ...

Stress and coping among early childhood intervention professionals receiving reflective supervision: A qualitative analysis.

Reflective supervision/consultation (RS/C) is an important component of infant mental health training and practice. Given high levels of job stress reported by a variety of early childhood professionals, the present study offers a qualitative examination of early childhood intervention professionals' perceptions of stress and coping before and after receiving regular RS/C. Thirty-one professionals received 9 months of RS/C and completed semistructured interview questionnaires at the pre-/postassessments. Qu...

Maternal and infant characteristics connected to shared pleasure in dyadic interaction.

The aim of the study was to analyze which maternal factors (depressive symptoms, effect of life events, maternal sensitivity and structuring) and infant characteristics (temperament, social withdrawal symptoms, interactive behavior, genotype, gender) contribute to shared pleasure (SP) in parent-infant interaction. Participants were 113 mother-infant dyads. The mothers filled in the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, the Infant Behavior Questionnaire, and the Life Events Questionnaire. The dyads were vide...

Defensive patterns in reflective group supervisions at Child Health Centres.

Reflective group supervision with infant healthcare workers has been described in several publications. It aims to enhance their ability to help distressed families, and to comprehend and relieve themselves of the distress that they encounter in such work. The ultimate aim has been formulated as an effort at increasing the professional's reflective function. The present article adds to the literature by applying an ego-psychological perspective on the group process and investigating defensive patterns in su...

A step forward to quality: The home visit rating scales and the measurement of process quality in home-visiting programs.

Impact of infant crying on mothers with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder: A qualitative study.

Mothers with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and their infants often have compromised relationships. To further understand the complexities, this study explored (a) the experiences of mothers with BPD in response to infant crying and (b) how these parenting responses impact on mothers' interpersonal functioning with significant others. Six mothers with clinical BPD were recruited from a mother-baby psychiatric unit and interviewed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach. Trans...

Quality home visits: Activities to promote meaningful interactions.

Examination of and support for specific practices that promote high-quality home visiting are essential as family support programs continue to expand across the country. The current study used direct observation of 91 home visits across 41 home visitors to examine relations among interaction partners, content of the interactions, the home-visitors' activities, and quality of home-visitors' practices and family-members' engagement within programs funded by the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visit...

The Home Visit Rating Scales: Revised, restructured, and revalidated.

The Home Visit Rating Scales (HOVRS) were initially developed from field-based descriptions of successful home visits and are supported by home-visiting research in multiple disciplines. Four home-visiting practices scales include indicators of relationship building with families, responsiveness to family strengths, facilitation of parent-child interaction, and collaboration with parents. Three family engagement scales include indicators of parent-child interaction, parent engagement, and child engagement i...

Examining program quality in early childhood home visiting: From infrastructure to relationships.

Although there are many examples of evidence-based early childhood home-visiting programming, the field itself struggles with modest outcomes and variable levels of program effectiveness. This article documents the experience of creating a statewide monitoring system to assess home-visiting program quality and compliance to identified standards, integrating multiple sources of information across different domains of functioning. Monitoring results from 57 programs are summarized, with variable but promising...

Understanding quality in home visiting-How Far Have We Come and Where Do We Need to Go?

Observing home-visit quality with the home visit rating scales: Introduction to the special section.

Evidence-based home-visiting programs aim to address one of the most important challenges facing our species-setting the next generation on a healthy path of development that prepares them for a future that is simultaneously uncertain and promising. Diverse research literatures have pointed to practices to effectively meet this challenge and better achieve the unfulfilled promise of home visiting by more effectively engaging parents in supporting their children's early development and well-being. Measures o...

Case-contrast study about parent-infant interaction in a Brazilian sample of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders.

Siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) present greater susceptibility to developmental problems, in comparison with siblings of typically developing children. The greater prevalence of mental health disorders among parents of children with ASD increases younger siblings' vulnerability to emotional problems. The aim of this study is to compare the interaction between carers and babies aged 2 to 26 months (M = 11.7, SD = 6.9) who are siblings of children with ASD (ASD dyads) with the inter...

Like mother, like child? Maternal determinants of children's early social-emotional development.

Social-Emotional competencies evolve early in life. For example, early emotion regulation is learned primarily in the context of mother-child interaction, which may allow for maternal influences to shape children's social-emotional development. The aim of the current study was to longitudinally examine maternal determinants of children's early social-emotional development in a community-based sample of first-time mothers (N = 61, aged 22-39 years). Specifically, we used structural equation modeling to exami...

Maternal experience of their infants' crying in the context of war trauma: Determinants and consequences.

We examined, first, how prenatal maternal mental health and war trauma predicted mothers' experience of their infant crying, indicated by emotions, cognitions, and behavior; and second, how these experiences influenced the mother-infant interaction and infant development. Participants were 511 Palestinian mothers from the Gaza Strip, reporting their war trauma, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and perceived stress during pregnancy (Time 1). They reported experiences of infant cr...

Associations between child physical abuse potential, observed maternal parenting, and young children's emotion regulation: Is participation in Early Head Start protective?

Clinicians working with Early Head Start (EHS) families consider family well-being and positive parent-child relationships as foundational to school readiness. Understanding the links between risk factors and these dimensions of family engagement can inform clinical decision-making, as risk assessments are used to tailoring program services. The current study examined the associations between high risk, or potential, for child physical abuse and both parenting quality and children's emotion regulation (ER) ...

Early childhood education and crime.

This article presents new evidence on the crime-reducing impacts of a high-quality, intensive early childhood program with long-term follow-up, evaluated by a randomized controlled trial. Proportionately, more women than men decrease their criminal activity after participating in the program. This gender difference arises because of the worse home environments for girls, with corresponding greater scope for improvement by the program. For both genders, treatment effects are larger for the least-advantaged c...

Sex differences in the development of physical aggression: An intergenerational perspective and implications for preventive interventions.

This article reviews the state of knowledge on the development of chronic physical aggression (CPA), with the aim of identifying the most effective prevention strategies. We specifically focus on the early development of physical aggression, on sex differences in the use of physical aggression, and on the transmission of behavior problems from one generation to the other. The body of research on the development of CPA from the past three decades that we review shows increasing evidence that its prevention r...

Lead exposure and child maltreatment as models for how to conceptualize early-in-life risk factors for violence.

Although rates of violent crime have been on the decline in the United States for the past two decades, young people-and particularly young men-continue to commit and fall victim to alarmingly high rates of violence. Effective prevention requires data on what the determinants of violence are and when in the life course they emerge. The goal of this review was to identify early-in-life risk factors for violence and to describe (a) who is most affected and (b) effect mechanisms. I focus on abuse and neglect a...

The affective basis of violence.

Violence is a complex matter, and understandingly perhaps, it is the objective, behavioral aspects that are commonly focused on. Here, however, it is the subjective psychological and especially affective substrates of violence that are brought to the fore. Psychoanalytic perspectives provide a way of thinking about these that also sets them in a human-developmental context. In this essay, psychoanalytic ideas about aggression and violence are considered, and what they have to say about the relationship betw...

The early biopsychosocial development of boys and the origins of violence in males.

We apply a biopsychosocial approach to introduce early-in-life experiences that explain a significant part of the male preponderance in the perpetration of violence. Early caregiver abuse and neglect, father absence, and exposure to family and neighborhood violence exacerbate boys' greater risk for aggressive behavior and increase the probability of carrying out violent acts later in life. We examine the development of the psychological self and explore conditions that encourage physical aggression, focusin...

A neurodevelopmental perspective on male violence.

Research is increasingly documenting a neurobiological basis to violence. This review takes a neurodevelopmental perspective on the very small group of males who grow up to become persistent violent offenders. After outlining six criteria for what constitutes a neurodevelopmental disorder, the extent to which chronic violence meets these definitional criteria is examined, covering the fields of genetics, structural and functional brain imaging, and neuropsychology. Early health risk factors for violence are...

Early-life risk for domestic violence perpetration: Implications for practice and policy.

Research on risks and causes of domestic violence is hampered by a policy framework that not only does not fund but in some cases suppresses inquiry into those causes. This discussion, then, will be placed in the context of those policy frameworks that hamper and distort inquiry. This includes an overview of ideological, political, and historical issues that have shaped those frameworks. Related explanatory theories and theories of practice are summarized. The article will examine known early-life risk fact...

Considering the role of early discrimination experiences and the parent-child relationship in the development of disruptive behaviors in adolescence.

Discrimination has been shown to be related to diminished psychological adjustment and greater risk for substance use when personally experienced by adolescents and when their caregivers experience discrimination. Our research considers the impact of primary caregiver experiences of racial- and socioeconomic-based discrimination in early (age 3-5 years) and late childhood (age 9½) on adolescent disruptive behaviors (age 14) with a large sample of diverse caregiver-child dyads (N = 634). In addition, we exa...

ON EXACTITUDE IN SCIENCE: A MAP OF THE EMPIRE THE SIZE OF THE EMPIRE.

In the service of children's best interests, we argue for a sharpening of the evidentiary standards used in family court decision making, from preponderance of (occasionally substandard) evidence to "beyond a reasonable doubt." Second, we call for a move in child protection cases from static diagnoses (e.g., attachment classifications) to assessments of the potential for enhanced parenting. Finally, informed by the implications of the replication crisis in the biomedical and psychological sciences, we appla...


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