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PubMed Journal Database | Journal of lesbian studies RSS

14:46 EST 11th November 2019 | BioPortfolio

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Showing PubMed Articles 1–25 of 49 from Journal of lesbian studies

From situated space to social space: Dyke bar commemoration as reparative action.

Drawing on an ethnography of dyke bar commemoration in four U.S. cities, this article applies Sedgwick's concept of "reparative reading" to commemorative practices, tracing how commemorators leverage this reading to guide a . They commemorate material spaces rooted in place, but cultivate mobile and inclusive space. That is, commemorators, most of whom have had limited exposure to the spaces that they mourn, carefully situate the lost dyke bar, highlighting geographic, esthetic, demographic, and temporal at...

"That crosscountry 1969 vw squareback and holiday inn affair": lesbian mobility.

This article argues that lesbian mobility contributed to the development of lesbian identity in North America in the 1960s and 1970s. Drawing primarily on published accounts, it explores the ways in which women achieved and sustained their lesbian identity in part through their access to what cultural geographers term a transportation assemblage or constellation of mobility. This was constituted through the symbolic meaning of mobility for predominantly white women, the existence of new highway networks and...

Queer space and alternate queer geographies: LBQ women and the search for sexual partners at two LGBTQ-friendly U.S. universities.

The postgay era - marked by decreased stigmatization of non-heterosexual identities and increasing assimilation of gays and lesbians into the heterosexual mainstream - may be indicative of a broader pluralization of queer geographies expanding the social and sexual opportunities of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ)-identified individuals beyond queer spaces. Less is known, however, about how LBQ women experience these pluralized geographies in a postgay era in their search for sexual pa...

Entangling past, present, and future to examine queerness and white privilege in academia.

Lesbians have limited visibility or representation in educational research, and there has been even less consideration of the ways that lesbians' experiences are racialized. Using a methodological approach that entwines Karen Barad's concept of queer temporalities with Kimberlé Crenshaw's discussion of single-axis intersectionality, this paper uses critical autoethnography to offer narrative examinations of the author's queerness as constantly enmeshed with her Whiteness. The author considers the degrees t...

Legible lesbian lines: The bilingual poetry of Irena Klepfisz.

This article focuses on the poetry of Jewish lesbian poet Irena Klepfisz, written in New York starting in the 1970s. While drawing on the tradition of Yiddish women's poetry from the first half of the twentieth century, both as scholar and poet, Klepfisz also creates a brand new, bilingual, Yiddish-English poetic mode. By mobilizing both Yiddish and English to voice her poetic and political concerns, Klepfisz stages the English/Yiddish encounter as a site where dominant norms in both languages can be challe...

Experiences of a gender non-conforming lesbian in the "ladies' (rest)room".

Public restrooms in U.S. culture are highly gendered, politicized, problematic spaces. Gender non-conforming lesbians may feel especially at risk for various forms of harassment or policing by other occupants in the "ladies' (rest)room." Using auto-ethnographic lived experiences as observations, this essay explores reactions of other women/female occupants in public restrooms designated for female persons to the presence of a gender non-conforming lesbian (the author). Reactions include no response, fear an...

Lovers, enemies, and friends: The complex and coded early history of lesbian comic strip characters.

This article seeks to recuperate four previously unexamined early newspaper comic strip characters that could lay the groundwork for queer comic studies. The titular characters in Lucy and Sophie Say Goodbye (1905), Sanjak in Terry and the Pirates (1939) by Milton Caniff, and Hank O'Hair in Brenda Starr, Reporter (1940) by Dale Messick are analyzed through close readings, supporting archival material, and interviews. The article also theorizes the identification of the creator of Lucy and Sophie Say Go...

A regressive formula of perversity: Wertham and the women of comics.

This essay serves as a close reading of psychiatrist Fredric Wertham's 1950s descriptions and critiques of female comics characters. I draw on archival sources as well as relevant texts in the study of gender and sexuality. Additionally, I integrate ideas from two of his close associates, folklorist Gershon Legman and psychiatrist Hilde Mosse, whose contributions to Seduction of the Innocent are woven-often invisibly-throughout that text. The character of Wonder Woman serves as a touchstone, but other provo...

"Flabulously" femme: Queer fat femme women's identities and experiences.

This article explores how queer fat femme women experience, negotiate, and resist heteronormativity, misogyny, and fatphobia, alongside other intersecting oppressions. By analyzing fat femmes' narratives presented in blogs and personal essays, this article examines themes including: the role of femme in fat queers (re)claiming femininities, the masculinizing and/or feminizing effects of "fatness" for queer femmes, the mutual constitution of fatphobia and femmephobia, femme fa(t)shion, fat femme (in)visibili...

Situating Cyberzone: Black lesbian identity in comics.

Cyberzone is a fitting place to start any discussion around Black lesbian identity in comics, as it is the first comic book that this researcher could find which features a Black lesbian female lead superheroine. Cyberzone was self-published by Jimmie Robinson in 1994 and later re-vamped into a mini-comic series called Amanda and Gunn with Image Comics. First, this article deconstructs Cyberzone through the lens of Cultural Prism Theory (CPT). Second, this article situates Cyberzone within the framework of ...

Survival angst: Reading Hothead Paisan in the Trump era.

This essay considers Diane DiMassa's 1990s comic book series Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist alongside the recent rise and visibility of White supremacist movements following the 2016 United States election. While Hothead's acts of queer revenge primarily target White heterosexual cismen, several issues feature Hothead taking aim at neo-Nazis and the KKK. Exploring the way in which Hothead's relationship to debility and capacity is mediated by her gender, sexuality, and race, the essay argues th...

"There is no such thing as a straight woman": Queer female representations in South Asian graphic narratives.

This essay provides a brief overview of some recent Indian and Bangladeshi comics and graphic novels, whether print-based or online, which feature queer female characters. The essay contextualizes these texts with respect to the anti-LGBTQ+ legal climate in South Asian countries, but also places them within a larger trajectory of literary representations of queer (female) love in the Indian subcontinent. The texts under examination range from print graphic novels and indie comics anthologies in India to com...

Representations of same-sex relationships between female characters in all-ages comics: Princess Princess Ever After and Lumberjanes.

Representations of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) characters in comics for an all-ages readership have emerged in the United States in the early twenty-first century. This essay examines the narrative constructions of same-sex relationships between female characters in two all-ages speculative fiction comics, Princess Princess Ever After by Katie O'Neill, and Lumberjanes, created by Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, Noelle Stevenson, and Brooke Allen.

Introduction: "Suffering Sappho!": Lesbian content and queer female characters in comics.

Comics have been an important locus of queer female identity, community, and politics for generations. Whether taking the form of newspaper strips, comic books, or graphic novels and memoirs, the medium has a long history of featuring female same-sex attraction, relationships, and identity. This special issue explores the past place, current presence, and possible future status of lesbianism in comics. It features essays about cartoonists such as Jennifer Camper, characters such as Wonder Woman, and titles ...

Queering biology, gutting feminism: A review essay of Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015).

The author reviews Elizabeth A. Wilson's Gut Feminism (2015), arguing that Wilson's book productively challenges some of feminist theory's most entrenched presuppositions: that social, cultural, and discursive frameworks are opposed and superior to biological ones; that biological matter is flat, sovereign, monolithic, and determining; that depression is more a cultural, historical, and psychological phenomenon than a biochemical and pharmaceutical one (and that these nominative distinctions are stable and ...

Thanks to reviewers.

Lesbians and tech: Analyzing digital media technologies and lesbian experience.

The rise of the popular Internet has coincided with the increasing acceptance, even assimilation, of lesbians into mainstream society. The visible presence of lesbians in the tech industry and in digitally mediated spaces raises a set of questions about the relationship between queer identities and Internet technologies. This introduction to a special issue of Journal of Lesbian Studies explores some of these questions and provides an overview of the articles that follow.

Gaming out online: Black lesbian identity development and community building in Xbox Live.

As gaming culture continues to marginalize women and people of color, other gamers are also highlighting the inequalities they face within digital gaming communities. While heterosexism and homophobia are commonplace within gaming culture, little is known about the actual experiences of "gaymers" and even less about "gaymers" of color. As such, this article seeks to explore lesbians of color and their experiences "gayming" out and online. Exploring identity development, community building, and connectivity ...

Mommy markets: Racial differences in lesbians' dating preferences for women with children.

Recent work shows that race is a critical factor in shaping sexual identities, partner preference, and family formation, suggesting there may be racial differences in whether lesbians already have children at the time that they look for companions. In this study, we draw on a sample of 1,923 lesbians on Match.com to quantitatively test whether there are racial differences in dating preferences for women with children, underscoring implications for family inequality through racial differences in who has chil...

Rethinking monogamy's nature: From the truth of non/monogamy to a dyke ethics of "antimonogamy".

Following Lynne Huffer's work on queer feminism, this abridged essay centers the figure of the lesbian in order to develop a dyke ethics that engenders nuanced thinking about both monogamy and embodiment. The essay reads Alison Bechdel's comic strip, Dykes to Watch Out For, to elaborate a "dyke ethics of anti-monogamy." Grounded in notions of friendship, community, and social justice, this ethics decenters the sexual dyad in a way that polyamory does not. It also insists upon a theoretical and ethical dispo...

The role of internalized homonegativity in the faith and psychological health of lesbians.

Among lesbians, faith-based beliefs and behaviors may be associated with negative psychological health due to the interplay between religious and sexual identities. The present study examined health outcomes, faith-based beliefs (views of God as loving and controlling), faith-based behaviors (personal spiritual practices, religious activities), and internalized homonegativity in a sample of 225 self-identified lesbians. We hypothesized that internalized homonegativity would moderate the relationship between...

Foreword: Biology/embodiment/desire.

The sexological roots of "lesbian" and the "queer" turn from biologized categories of sexual difference pose an exciting set of questions and tensions for thinking about queer feminism and biological meanings. This issue seeks to open space to explore how we might reconcile assumptions about "female same-sex sexuality" that often accompany "lesbian" with queer and trans-feminist treatments of science, embodiment, and desiring, while at the same time insisting on the importance of an undertheorized dyke lega...

Queering biology, gutting feminism: A review essay of Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015).

The author reviews Elizabeth A. Wilson's Gut Feminism (2015), arguing that Wilson's book productively challenges some of feminist theory's most entrenched presuppositions: that social, cultural, and discursive frameworks are opposed and superior to biological ones; that biological matter is flat, sovereign, monolithic, and determining; that depression is more a cultural, historical, and psychological phenomenon than a biochemical and pharmaceutical one (and that these nominative distinctions are stable and ...

Becoming lesbian: Monique Wittig's queer-trans-feminism.

Inspired by Lynne Huffer's queer feminist genealogy, this article explores queer-trans-feminism as a project that would bring together queer, feminist, and transgender theory and politics into a shared critical lineage. I suggest that Monique Wittig is a neglected thinker who could re-enliven connections and debates within queer, feminist, and trans theory and politics. Utilizing recent historiographies of queer and feminist theory, I imagine what it would mean to hold on to the figure of the lesbian as a f...

A crisis emerges: Lesbian health between breast cancer and HIV/AIDS.

In this essay, I argue that lesbians have come to be a population of concern for state-based health organizations as a result of lesbian health activism that drew connections between breast cancer and HIV/AIDS. In order to develop this analysis, I tell the story of the rise of lesbian breast cancer activism in concert with HIV/AIDS in San Francisco in the early 1990s. The state recognition of lesbian health needs, and with it the solidification of lesbian as a biopolitical category, was catalyzed by associa...


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