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PubMed Journals Articles About "Bioprinting Technique Creates Lifelike Tissues From Natural Materials" RSS

10:21 EDT 17th September 2019 | BioPortfolio

Bioprinting Technique Creates Lifelike Tissues From Natural Materials PubMed articles on BioPortfolio. Our PubMed references draw on over 21 million records from the medical literature. Here you can see the latest Bioprinting Technique Creates Lifelike Tissues From Natural Materials articles that have been published worldwide.

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Showing "Bioprinting Technique Creates Lifelike Tissues From Natural Materials" PubMed Articles 1–25 of 20,000+

3D bioprinting models of neural tissues: the current state of the field and future directions.

3D bioprinting can potentially revolutionize the field of neural tissue engineering by increasing its throughput and reproducibility. However, many obstacles must be overcome to realize this immense potential. This review first discusses how 3D hydrogels can serve as powerful tools for engineering neural tissue, especially when combined with different types of cells. These tools enable us to gain a better understanding of neural tissue development and its associated disease states. Next, we define 3D biopri...


In situ Bioprinting - Bioprinting from Benchside to Bedside?

Bioprinting technologies have been advancing at the convergence of automation, digitalization, and new tissue engineering (TE) approaches. In situ bioprinting may be favored during certain situations when compared with the conventional in vitro bioprinting when de novo tissues are to be printed directly on the intended anatomical location in the living body. To date, few attempts have been made to fabricate in situ tissues, which can be safely arrested and immobilized while printing in preclinical living mo...

In situ three-dimensional printing for reparative and regenerative therapy.

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging biofabrication technology, driving many innovations and opening new avenues in regenerative therapeutics. The aim of 3D bioprinting is to fabricate grafts in vitro, which can then be implanted in vivo. However, the tissue culture ex vivo carries safety risks and thereby complicated manufacturing equipment and practice are required for tissues to be implanted in the humans. The implantation of printed tissues also adds complexities due to the difficulty in ma...


Construction of 3D in vitro models by bioprinting human pluripotent stem cells: challenges and opportunities.

Three-dimensional (3D) printing of biological material, or 3D bioprinting, is a rapidly expanding field with interesting applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Bioprinters use cells and biocompatible materials as an ink (bioink) to build 3D structures representative of organs and tissues, in a controlled manner and with micrometric resolution. Human embryonic (hESCs) and induced (iPSCs) pluripotent stem cells are ideally able to provide all cell types found in the human body. A limite...

4D Bioprinting: Technological Advances in Biofabrication.

The development of the three-dimensional (3D) printer has resulted in significant advances in a number of fields, including rapid prototyping and biomedical devices. For 3D structures, the inclusion of dynamic responses to stimuli is added to develop the concept of four-dimensional (4D) printing. Typically, 4D printing is useful for biofabrication by reproducing a stimulus-responsive dynamic environment corresponding to physiological activities. Such a dynamic environment can be precisely designed with an u...

Bioprinting Approaches to Engineering Vascularized 3D Cardiac Tissues.

3D bioprinting technologies hold significant promise for the generation of engineered cardiac tissue and translational applications in medicine. To generate a clinically relevant sized tissue, the provisioning of a perfusable vascular network that provides nutrients to cells in the tissue is a major challenge. This review summarizes the recent vascularization strategies for engineering 3D cardiac tissues.

Three-dimensional bioprinting human cardiac tissue chips of using a painting needle method.

Three-dimensional (3D) printers are attracting attention as a method for arranging and building cells in three dimensions. Bioprinting technology has potential in tissue engineering for the fabrication of scaffolds, cells, and tissues. However, these various printing technologies have limitations with respect to print resolution and due to the characteristics of bioink such as viscosity. We report a method for constructing of 3D tissues with a "microscopic painting device using a painting needle method" tha...

Thermally-controlled extrusion-based bioprinting of collagen.

Thermally-crosslinked hydrogels in bioprinting have gained increasing attention due to their ability to undergo tunable crosslinking by modulating the temperature and time of crosslinking. In this paper, we present a new bioink composed of collagen type-I and Pluronic® F-127 hydrogels, which was bioprinted using a thermally-controlled bioprinting unit. Bioprintability and rheology of the composite bioink was studied in a thorough manner in order to determine the optimal bioprinting time and extrusion profi...

Outlooks on Three-Dimensional Printing for Ocular Biomaterials Research.

Given its potential for high-resolution, customizable, and waste-free fabrication of medical devices and biological models, 3-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has broad utility within the biomaterials field. Indeed, 3D bioprinting has to date been successfully used for the development of drug delivery systems, the recapitulation of hard biological tissues, and the fabrication of cellularized organ and tissue-mimics, among other applications. In this study, we highlight convergent efforts within engineering, ce...

Recent advances in 3D bioprinting of stem cells.

In spite of being a new field, 3D bioprinting has undergone rapid growth in the recent years. Bioprinting methods offer a unique opportunity for stem cell distribution, positioning, and differentiation at the microscale to make the differentiated architecture of any tissue while maintaining precision and control over the cellular microenvironment. Bioprinting introduces a wide array of approaches to modify stem cell fate. This review discusses these methodologies of 3D bioprinting stem cells. Fabricating a ...

Collagen-based bioinks for hard tissue engineering applications: a comprehensive review.

In the last few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has been gaining great interest in the fabrication of complex structures for soft-to-hard tissues regeneration, with tailored porosity, and boosted structural, mechanical, and biological properties. 3D printing is one of the most known AM techniques in the field of biofabrication of tissues and organs. This technique opened up opportunities over the conventional ones, with the capability of creating replicable, customized, and functional structures that can...

Skin bioprinting: the future of burn wound reconstruction?

Burns are a significant cause of trauma, and over the years, the focus of patient care has shifted from just survival to facilitation of improved functional outcomes. Typically, burn treatment, especially in the case of extensive burn injuries, involves surgical excision of injured skin and reconstruction of the burn injury with the aid of skin substitutes. Conventional skin substitutes do not contain all skin cell types and do not facilitate recapitulation of native skin physiology. Three-dimensional (3D)...

Bioprinting of a cell-laden conductive hydrogel composite.

Bioprinting has gained significant attention for creating biomimetic tissue constructs with potential to be used in applications such as drug screening or regeneration therapy. Ideally, biomaterials used for three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting should match the mechanical, hydrostatic, bioelectric, and physicochemical properties of the native tissues. However, many materials with these tissue-like properties are not compatible with printing techniques without modifying their compositions. In addition, integra...

Layer-by-layer ultraviolet assisted extrusion-based (UAE) bioprinting of hydrogel constructs with high aspect ratio for soft tissue engineering applications.

One of the major challenges in the field of soft tissue engineering using bioprinting is fabricating complex tissue constructs with desired structure integrity and mechanical property. To accomplish such requirements, most of the reported works incorporated reinforcement materials such as poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer within the 3D bioprinted constructs. Although this approach has made some progress in constructing soft tissue-engineered scaffolds, the mechanical compliance mismatch and long degradati...

Cell-laden 4D bioprinting using NIR-triggered shape morphing alginate/polydopamine bioinks.

Four-dimensional (4D) bioprinting of cell-laden constructs with programming shape morphing structures has gained increasing attention in the field of biofabrication and tissue engineering. Currently, most of the widely used materials for 4D printing including N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) based polymers, are not commonly used bioinks for cell-laden bioprinting. Herein, we proposed a facile approach to create cell-laden constructs with near infrared (NIR)-triggered shape morphing using alginate (the most wid...

Tissue biomechanics of the human head are altered by Thiel embalming, restricting its use for biomechanical validation.

Thiel embalming is a well-known method of anatomical fixation giving lifelike optical and haptic tissue properties. Beyond these characteristics, Thiel embalming may also be a promising method to provide lifelike tissues for validation purposes of human head biomechanics. Recent investigations using Thiel-embalmed human tissues of the upper and lower limb yielded contradicting biomechanical results on fixation-induced changes in the tissues' load-deformation behavior. It is to date unclear, if Thiel embalmi...

Marine-derived natural polymer-based bioprinting ink for biocompatible, durable, and controllable 3D constructs.

3D bioprinting (3DBP) is a rapid solid-form fabrication method with a high degree of automation and reproducibility for constructing structural bioscaffolds. However, the development of the 3DBP field has been slowed due to difficulty in acquiring suitable ink materials especially with natural polymers that satisfy all requirements, such as printability, mechanical integrity, and biocompatibility. In this study, a new 3DBP ink of bioengineered sea anemone-derived silk-like protein (aneroin) was used based o...

Photopolymerizable gelatin and hyaluronic acid for stereolithographic 3D bioprinting of tissue-engineered cartilage.

To create artificial cartilage in vitro, mimicking the function of native extracellular matrix (ECM) and morphological cartilage-like shape is essential. The interplay of cell patterning and matrix concentration has high impact on the phenotype and viability of the printed cells. To advance the capabilities of cartilage bioprinting, we investigated different ECMs to create an in vitro chondrocyte niche. Therefore, we used methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) and methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA) in a stereolith...

The use of bacterial polysaccharides in bioprinting.

Additive manufacturing or 3D printing has spearheaded a revolution in the biomedical sector allowing the rapid prototyping of medical devices. The recent advancements in bioprinting technology are enabling the development of potential new therapeutic options with respect to tissue engineering and regenerative medicines. Bacterial polysaccharides have been shown to be a central component of the inks used in a variety of bioprinting processes influencing their key features such as the mechanical and thermal p...

3D Bioprinting of Complex Channels within Cell-Laden Hydrogels.

3D bioprinting is an emerging manufacturing approach to fabricate (cell-laden) hydrogel constructs with embedded microchannels, which are potentially useful for fundamental studies to understand vascularization and angiogenesis, and for developing organ-on-a-chip devices for disease modeling. Although numerous printing approaches have been developed, novel approaches are still needed that enable printing of channels with user-defined and tunable size, morphology, and complexity. Here, we report a novel biop...

Advances in 3D Bioprinting of Bone: Progress and Challenges.

Several attempts have been made to engineer a viable 3D bone tissue equivalent using conventional tissue engineering strategies, but with limited clinical success. Using 3D bioprinting technology, scientists have developed functional prototypes of clinically relevant and mechanically robust bone with a functional bone marrow. Although, the field is in its infancy, it has shown immense potential in the field of bone tissue engineering by re-establishing the 3D dynamic microenvironment of the native bone. Ins...

Chemical insights into bioinks for 3D printing.

3D printing has triggered the acceleration of numerous research areas in health sciences, which traditionally used cells as starting materials, in particular tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and also in the design of more relevant bioassays for drug discovery and development. While cells can be successfully printed in 2D layers without the help of any supporting biomaterial, the obtainment of more complex 3D architectures requires a specific bioink, i.e. a material in which the cells are embedded d...

3D Bioprinting of cardiac tissue and cardiac stem cell therapy.

Cardiovascular tissue engineering endeavors to repair or regenerate damaged or ineffective blood vessels, heart valves, and cardiac muscle. Current strategies that aim to accomplish such a feat include the differentiation of multipotent or pluripotent stem cells on appropriately designed biomaterial scaffolds that promote the development of mature and functional cardiac tissue. The advent of additive manufacturing 3D bioprinting technology further advances the field by allowing heterogenous cell types, biom...

Human platelet lysate-based nanocomposite bioink for bioprinting hierarchical fibrillar structures.

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting holds the promise to fabricate tissue and organ substitutes for regenerative medicine. However, the lack of bioactive inks to fabricate and support functional living constructs is one of the main limitations hindering the progress of this technology. In this study, a biofunctional human-based nanocomposite bioink (HUink) composed of platelet lysate hydrogels reinforced by cellulose nanocrystals is reported. When combined with suspended bioprinting technologies, HUink allow...

Mueller matrix imaging of prostate bulk tissues; Polarization parameters as a discriminating benchmark.

The polarimetry imaging technique has provided a powerful tool for discriminating the normal from the cancerous tissues. In this paper, based on the backscattering Mueller matrix imaging of prostate bulk tissues, (received immediately after surgery without any further processing), we have extracted the characteristic features of the Mueller matrix images. In order to provide a quantitative and more accurate comparison, three different methods have been used; the Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD), th...


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