PubMed Journals Articles About "Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment" RSS

00:17 EDT 22nd March 2018 | BioPortfolio

Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment PubMed articles on BioPortfolio. Our PubMed references draw on over 21 million records from the medical literature. Here you can see the latest Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment articles that have been published worldwide.

More Information about "Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment" on BioPortfolio

We have published hundreds of Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment news stories on BioPortfolio along with dozens of Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment Clinical Trials and PubMed Articles about Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment for you to read. In addition to the medical data, news and clinical trials, BioPortfolio also has a large collection of Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment Companies in our database. You can also find out about relevant Blacks Women Same Health Benefit From Employment Drugs and Medications on this site too.

Showing "Blacks women same health benefit from employment" PubMed Articles 1–25 of 25,000+

Post-migration employment changes and health: A dyadic spousal analysis.

Prospective studies have found unemployment and job loss to be associated with negative psychological and physical health outcomes. For immigrants, the health implications of employment change cannot be considered apart from pre-migration experiences. While immigrants demonstrate relative success in securing employment in the United States, their work is often not commensurate with their education or expertise. Previous research has linked downward employment with adverse health outcomes among immigrants, b...

The ramifications of recent health policy actions for cardiovascular care of women: Progress, threats, and opportunities.

Women's health and well-being are shaped by a combination of healthcare policies that impact the type of health insurance coverage they benefit from, as well as access to preventive, screening, and treatment services. Furthermore, more distal policies, such as those that pertain to housing, education, and employment, as well as social determinants of health, such as issues of socioeconomic status and women's status in society, also impact their cardiac health. Before the passage of the Affordable Care Act i...

Change in cardiometabolic risk among blacks, whites and Hispanics: findings from the Health and Retirement Study.

Blacks experience greater multi-system physiological dysregulation, or cumulative biological risk, which is associated with poor cardiometabolic health and mortality. In this study, we assess race differences in change in risk over four years among older whites, blacks and Hispanics.

Is retirement good for men's health? Evidence using a change in the retirement age in Israel.

This study examines the effect of employment on elderly men's health. A typical OLS analysis yields a positive relationship between employment and health for individuals in their sixties. Causality, however, is difficult to infer because healthier individuals are more capable of working than others. To overcome this endogeneity problem, this paper exploits the increase in the full retirement age for men in Israel from sixty-five to sixty-seven in 2004. After this change, the employment rate of men in this a...

Hypertension among US-born and foreign-born non-Hispanic Blacks: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2014 data.

Non-Hispanic Blacks in the United States have the highest reported prevalence of hypertension (44%) worldwide. However, this does not consider the heterogeneity of Blacks within the United States, particularly comparing US-born to long-standing or recent (foreign-born) immigrants. The objective of this study is to compare odds of hypertension between US-born and foreign-born Blacks in the United States.

Association Between Employment and Mental Health Service Use Among Justice-Involved Individuals.

Using a nationally representative sample of justice-involved persons (N = 1525), the present study examined the extent to which employment status was associated with mental health service use by various service providers. The findings indicate that the rate of mental health service use by general health care providers among the unemployed was higher than that of the employed. Factors associated with mental health service use varied by type of provider. Our findings suggest that employment may be critica...

Effect of Psychiatric Symptoms on Employment Outcomes for Individuals Receiving Supported Employment Services: A Preliminary Study.

Psychiatric symptoms are often cited by community-based providers as barriers to employment for individuals with mental health conditions. The current study assessed whether psychiatric symptoms and hospitalization in the past year predicted employment outcomes for participants receiving supported employment (SE) services. A total of 105 participants enrolled in SE services were assessed on their level of psychiatric symptoms, hospitalization in the past year, and employment outcomes. Simultaneous logistic ...

Subjective Well-Being in Older Chinese and Korean Immigrants in the United States: Effects of Self-Rated Health and Employment Status.

This study examined the effects of association between self-rated health and employment status on subjective well-being among older Chinese and Korean immigrants in the United States. Data were collected from 171 Chinese and 205 Korean older adult immigrants living in Los Angeles County. The primary variables included demographic data, subjective index of well-being, self-rated health, and employment status. Data support the association between self-rated health and subjective well-being for both groups. Em...

Sex and Race Differences in Lifetime Risk of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction and Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

Background -Lifetime risk of heart failure has been estimated to range from 20% to 46% in diverse sex and race groups. However, lifetime risk estimates for the two HF phenotypes, HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), is not known. Methods -Participant-level data from 2 large prospective cohort studies, the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), were pooled excluding individuals with prevalent HF at baseline....

The Relationship between Alcohol Drinking Patterns and Sleep Duration among Black and White Men and Women in the United States.

In the United States, racial minorities generally experience poorer cardiovascular health compared to whites, and differences in alcohol consumption and sleep could contribute to these disparities. With a nationally representative sample of 187,950 adults in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to 2015, we examined the relationship between alcohol-drinking patterns and sleep duration/quality by race and sex. Using Poisson regression models with robust variance, we estimated sex-specific prevalence...

Gender, social class, and women's employment.

People in low-power positions, whether due to gender or class, tend to exhibit other-oriented rather than self-oriented behavior. Women's experiences at work and at home are shaped by social class, heightening identification with gender for relatively upper class women and identification with class for relatively lower class women, potentially mitigating, or even reversing, class-based differences documented in past research. Gender-class differences are reflected in women's employment beliefs and behaviors...

The Risk of Remaining Silent: Addressing the Current Threats to Women's Health.

Associations Between Fixed-term Employment and Health and Behaviors: What are the Mechanisms?

To analyze the associations between fixed-term employment and health (work ability and mental health) and behaviors (engagement and performance). Psychological contract fulfilment (PCF) and breach (PCB) are investigated as potential mediators of these associations.

Long-Term Economic and Employment Outcomes Among Partners of Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

Work loss is one of many personal costs for patients with cancer and their families. Many women with breast cancer face long-term job loss that stems from their diagnoses. However, little is known about the economic and employment outcomes of partners of women with breast cancer.

Infertility and self-rated health among Malawian women.

Infertility is prevalent and stigmatized in sub-Saharan Africa. Self-rated health, a subjective indicator that has been consistently related to objectively measured health, may be useful in evaluating the relationship between women's infertility and health.

What Women's Health Wants in Your Market.

Women are a key focus segment for health care organizations both because of the medical services they utilize as individuals and the influence they have on the health care of others. In one survey, 59% of women and 94% of working moms reported making or heavily influencing health care decisions for their entire families.

Pregnant Women's Perceptions of the Risks and Benefits of Disclosure During Web-Based Mental Health E-Screening Versus Paper-Based Screening: Randomized Controlled Trial.

Pregnant women's perceptions of the risks and benefits during mental health screening impact their willingness to disclose concerns. Early research in violence screening suggests that such perceptions may vary by mode of screening, whereby women view the anonymity of e-screening as less risky than other approaches. Understanding whether mode of screening influences perceptions of risk and benefit of disclosure is important in screening implementation.

Prevalence of myeloma precursor state monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in 12372 individuals 10-49 years old: a population-based study from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

We studied the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) in younger individuals, age 10-49 years, using samples from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) III. NHANES prevalence rates were standardized to the 2000 US total population. Among 12 372 individuals (4073 blacks, 4146 Mexican-Americans, 3595 whites, and 558 others), MGUS was identified in 63 persons (0.34%, 95% CI 0.23-0.50). The prevalence of MGUS was significantly higher in blacks (0.88%,...

Development of a women's mental health curriculum and evolution to a Women's Mental Health Area of Concentration in a psychiatry residency program.

In 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health emphasized the importance of women's health education, particularly in the realm of behavioral health. In order to support the professional interests of psychiatry trainees, a women's mental health study group (WMHSG) was developed and implemented. The WMHSG aimed primarily to supplement the resident curriculum and promote consideration of careers in women's mental health. After successful implementation, the curriculum was ...

Message Received: African American Women and Breast Cancer Screening.

African American women are more likely than other women to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age, to be diagnosed at a late stage, and to die from the disease. Yet we see evidence of irregular screening and follow-up. Previous research on psychosocial factors influencing decisions to screen reveals barriers: fear, fatalistic perceptions of cancer, inaccurate perceptions of risk, and associations with stigma. The current qualitative research with, largely, insured African American women ( n = 26), h...

Women's Health Outpatient Care Teams: Focus on Advanced Practice Providers.

Team-based care in the outpatient women's health setting has the potential to help alleviate the demand for women's health care providers and to deliver improved quality of care to the growing population of US women. Although teamwork is necessary in the current health care system, most of the current obstetrics and gynecology and advanced practice provider (APP) workforce were not trained for collaborative practice. Core competencies for building an effective outpatient women's health care team are explain...

The Future Burden of Colorectal Cancer Among US Blacks and Whites.

Although overall colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates in the United States are declining, rates among younger persons (age < 55 years) are increasing, particularly among US whites. We assessed how these trends will impact the future burden (up to 2040) of CRC among US blacks and whites using an age-period-cohort model. Over the last four decades (1973 to 2014), CRC incidence rates for all ages (both sexes) have dropped by 6.6% and 33.9% in US blacks and whites, respectively. Yet we predict an upward turn...

A Report of the 24th Annual Congress on Women's Health-Workshop on Transforming Women's Health: From Research to Practice.

Sex and gender are critical contributors to overall health and disease, and considering both in research informs the development of prevention strategies and treatment interventions for both men and women. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health sponsored a preconference workshop on this topic at the 24th Annual Women's Health Congress, which was held in Crystal City, VA, in April 2016. The workshop featured presentations by NIH intramural and extramural scientists who p...

Drivers of Continuing Education Learning Preferences for Veterans Affairs Women's Health Primary Care Providers.

Documented gaps in health professionals' training in women's health are a special concern for continuing education (CE). In the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system, women veterans are a numerical minority, preferably assigned to designated women's health primary care providers (DWHPs). DWHPs need to maintain their knowledge and skills in women's health topics, in addition to general internal medicine topics. We explored drivers of VA DWHPs' learning preferences for women's health topics-ie, factors whi...

Physical activity - does it really increase bone density in postmenopausal women? A Review of articles published between 2001-2016.

Physical activity is known for its many health benefits, among them the positive effect on bone health during the life cycle. During childhood, physical stress stimulates bone remodeling and increases density. However, due to hormonal changes during adulthood, and mainly during postmenopause the rate of bone remodeling is slowed and is less efficient. As a result, argument has arisen in the literature regarding the benefit or harm of physical activity on bone health among postmenopausal women.

Quick Search