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The Effect of Physiotherapy Treatment Following Gynaecological Surgery

2014-08-27 03:48:51 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Optimal pelvic floor muscle function is known to assist bladder and bowel function and control, pelvic organ support, as well as other areas of health. It is also known that problems in some of tehse areas can be a consequence of pelvic surgery. By addressing the requirements for good bladder and bowel function/control, and organ support in the early post-surgery phase when tissue repair and scar formation are critical, it is proposed that there will be a rduction in the longterm prevalence of bladder problems, bowel difficulties and weakened pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in post-surgery patients. This study is a randomised controlled trial to compare patients undergoing a physiotherapy-supervised pelvic floor muscle training and behavioural therapy program with a control group. It is hypothesised that at the 12 month post-operative follow-up assessment, the treatment group will demonstrate better outcomes in bladder and bowel function and control, as well as stronger pelvic floor muscle contractile strength than the control group.

Description

Optimal pelvic floor muscle function is known to assist bladder and bowel function and control, pelvic organ support, as well as other areas of pelvic health. It is also known that problems in some of these areas can develop after pelvic surgery. By addressing the requirements for good bladder and bowel function/control, and organ support in the early post-surgical phase when tissue repair and scar formation are critical, it is proposed that there will be a reduction in the long-term prevalence of bladder and bowel dysfunction, and weak pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in post-surgical patients. There have been no previous studies investigating whether a physiotherapy intervention can assist pelvic function in this group of surgical patients.

This study aims to investigate the effect of a physiotherapy treatment program on pelvic function following gynaecological surgery.

Comparisons: Pre- and post-operative physiotherapy treatment vs no treatment following gynaecological surgery.

Outcome measures: Pelvic floor muscle strength, urine leakage, quality of life, sexual functioning, general fitness, measured at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operatively

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Vaginal Hysterectomy,

Intervention

Pelvic floor muscle training and lifestyle modification

Location

School of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne
Melbourne
Victoria
Australia
3010

Status

Completed

Source

University of Melbourne

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:48:51-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Injury, weakening, or PROLAPSE of the pelvic muscles, surrounding connective tissues or ligaments (PELVIC FLOOR).

Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.

Removal of the uterus through the vagina.

Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the female pelvic viscera by means of an endoscope introduced into the pelvic cavity through the posterior vaginal fornix.

Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.

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