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Everolimus and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Glioblastoma Multiforme or Progressive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

2014-08-27 03:54:18 | BioPortfolio

Summary

RATIONALE: Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by stopping blood flow to the tumor. Gefitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the enzymes necessary for their growth. Combining everolimus with gefitinib may kill more tumor cells.

PURPOSE: This phase I/II trial is studying the side effects and best dose of everolimus when given together with gefitinib and to see how well they work in treating patients with progressive glioblastoma multiforme or (progressive metastatic prostate cancer closed to accrual 10/19/06).

Description

OBJECTIVES:

Primary

- Determine the maximum tolerated dose of everolimus when given in combination with gefitinib in patients with progressive glioblastoma multiforme or (progressive castrate metastatic prostate cancer -closed to accrual as of 10/19/2006). (Phase I)

- Determine the safety and efficacy of this regimen in patients with progressive giloblastoma multiforme or (progressive castrate metastatic prostate cancer - closed to accrual as of 10/19/2006). (Phase II)

Secondary

- Determine whether a pharmacokinetic interaction exists between everolimus and gefitinib in patients treated with this regimen.

- Determine the association between clinical outcomes and markers that may predict sensitivity of a tumor in patients treated with this regimen.

- Determine the pharmacodynamic effects of this regimen on post-therapy tumor specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these patients.

OUTLINE: This is a phase I, open-label, non-randomized, dose-escalation study of everolimus followed by a phase II study.

- Phase I: Patients receive oral everolimus on day 1 and oral gefitinib once daily on days 8-21. Beginning on day 22, patients receive oral everolimus once weekly and oral gefitinib once daily. Treatment with the combination continues in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

Cohorts of 3-6 patients receive escalating doses of everolimus until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is determined. The MTD is defined as the dose preceding that at which 2 of 3 or 2 of 6 patients experience dose-limiting toxicity.

- Phase II (prostate cancer patients only) (closed to accrual as of 10/19/2006): Patients receive oral everolimus (at the MTD determined in phase I) once weekly and oral gefitinib once daily. Treatment continues in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 3-18 patients will be accrued for the phase I portion of this study within 6 months. A total of 27-40 patients will be accrued for the phase II portion of this study within 8 months.

Study Design

Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

Intervention

everolimus, gefitinib

Location

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York
New York
United States
10021

Status

Active, not recruiting

Source

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:54:18-0400

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