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Safety of a New Type of Treatment Called Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Severe Hemophilia B

2014-08-27 03:54:38 | BioPortfolio

Summary

In this study a modified virus called adeno-associated virus (AAV) will be used to transfer a normal gene for human clotting factor IX into patients with severe hemophilia B (AAV human Factor IX vector). Gene therapy is a very new medical technique being used in a number of clinical studies for diseases such as cancer and cystic fibrosis. At this time, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved no gene transfer products for commercial use. To date, 8 subjects have received AAV vector in the muscle for a hemophilia B trial by intramuscular injection, and, to date, 6 subjects have been treated with AAV vector in the current hemophilia B liver trial. Eleven cystic fibrosis subjects have received AAV vector into their nasal sinuses or lungs to date. In this study, AAV human Factor IX vector will be injected into the liver using a catheter inserted into a large blood vessel (called the proper hepatic artery or the right hepatic artery).

Study Design

Allocation: Non-Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Hemophilia B

Intervention

Adeno-Associated Viral with Human Factor IX

Location

Stanford University
Palo Alto
California
United States
94305

Status

Terminated

Source

Avigen

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:54:38-0400

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PubMed Articles [17805 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A hereditary deficiency of blood coagulation factor XI (also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent or PTA or antihemophilic factor C) resulting in a systemic blood-clotting defect called hemophilia C or Rosenthal's syndrome, that may resemble classical hemophilia.

A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008)

The classic hemophilia resulting from a deficiency of factor VIII. It is an inherited disorder of blood coagulation characterized by a permanent tendency to hemorrhage.

Storage-stable blood coagulation factor acting in the intrinsic pathway. Its activated form, IXa, forms a complex with factor VIII and calcium on platelet factor 3 to activate factor X to Xa. Deficiency of factor IX results in HEMOPHILIA B (Christmas Disease).

Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.

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