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Using fMRI to Evaluate Instructional Programs for Children With Developmental Dyslexia

2014-08-27 03:54:54 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Dyslexia is a common reading disorder. Specialized instructional programs can improve reading ability in children with dyslexia. This study will use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine changes in the brains of children who have taken part in these programs.

Description

Reading is a uniquely human endeavor and failure to develop this skill can lead to serious educational and emotional consequences. Reading more slowly or less accurately, as is the case in developmental dyslexia, occurs in between 5% and 15% of individuals in the United States. Developmental dyslexia significantly interferes with academic achievement and with activities of daily living that require reading skills. Although dyslexia is considered a reading disorder, dyslexia's clinical signs are varied and include deficits in the sensory domain, abnormal phonological awareness, and problems in related linguistic skills. Phonological awareness training and visual perceptual training can improve reading ability in children with dyslexia. Recent functional imaging studies on sensory and language processing in dyslexia have demonstrated involvement of the posterior temporal and inferior parietal cortical systems of the brain. However, how these brain areas are changed as a result of dyslexia treatment has not been determined.

This study will investigate the neurophysiologic changes before and after treatment in 11- to 14-year-old children immersed in Lindamood-Bell training utilizing either phonological (LiPS) or visual (Seeing Stars) strategies. These training programs have successful behavioral outcomes, but neurophysiologic changes have not been evaluated. The study will determine whether behavioral changes in reading skills result in physiological differences in the brain identifiable with functional brain imaging and whether initial physiological observations are indicative of the degree of success of the intervention.

Participant will be randomized to receive either Lindamood-Bell training, a math intervention (active control), or no intervention (passive control). The intervention will last 6 weeks; children will have both pre- and post-intervention behavioral testing and fMRI scans.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment, Masking: Single Blind, Primary Purpose: Educational/Counseling/Training

Conditions

Developmental Dyslexia

Intervention

Lindamood-Bell training for dyslexia

Location

Georgetown University
Washington
District of Columbia
United States
20057

Status

Active, not recruiting

Source

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:54:54-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)

Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia.

A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.

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