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Using Gene Modified Neuroblastoma Cells for the Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory Neuroblastoma

2014-08-27 03:55:08 | BioPortfolio

Summary

This research study is designed to determine the safety and dosage of special cells that may make a patients own immune system fight the cancer. To do this we will put two special genes into cancer cells taken from the patients body. The genes we put in make the cancer cells produce lymphotactin, a natural substance that attracts immune system cells to the cancer, and IL-2 a natural substance that may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Some of these cells will then be put back in your body. Studies of cancers in animals and in cancer cells that are grown in laboratories suggest that substances like lymphotactin and IL-2 help the body kill cancer cells. A treatment similar to this has been used in ten children previously and similar treatments are being used in adults with other cancers.

The purpose of this study is to learn the side effects and safe 'dosage' of these special cells.

Description

Neuroblastoma cells taken from the patient will be separated in the laboratory and two specially produced human viruses (adenovirus) that carry the lymphotactin and the IL-2 gene were put into the cells. These lymphotactin and IL-2 genes are meant to help the immune system fight the cancer.

The modified cancer cells will be injected under the patient's skin. There will be four shots. The second and subsequent shots will have ten times as many cells producing lymphotactin as the first. We do not know the best amount of special cells to use, so different patients will get different numbers of cells.

Before the second shot, and then again about 2 weeks later, we will remove some of the modified cells from the patient's body and study them. We will do this by removing a section of skin (referred to as a skin biopsy) at the place where the cells were injected. This test will help us to see whether or not the modified cells are killing cancer cells.

To study how the immunity is working in the patient's system, we will take blood samples prior to each injection, two to four days after each injection, and may repeat this 5-7 days after each injection if your doctor thinks that is necessary.

After patients have received the first set of 4 injections a complete evaluation is performed to see how this research treatment is working. If these evaluations look okay and if more injections are available, patients will have the option to receive a second set of 4 injections. If patients receive the second set of 4 injections, they will again have blood samples taken after each injection.

After injections stop, all patients will have blood samples collected once a month for a year, and then once a year for fifteen years.

To see if this research treatment is working, we will do CAT scans, MRIs, or bone scans (these are different types of x-rays). We will also take a bone marrow biopsy (bone marrow will be removed by use of a needle so that it can be looked at under the microscope). These tests will be done prior to treatment and again eight weeks later. In addition, if patients receive the second set of four injections, these tests will be repeated at six months.

Study Design

Allocation: Non-Randomized, Control: Uncontrolled, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Neuroblastoma

Intervention

Skin Biopsy, Injection of Gene Modified Neuroblastoma Cells

Location

Texas Children's Hospital
Houston
Texas
United States
77030

Status

Completed

Source

Baylor College of Medicine

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:55:08-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

An indolocarbazole that is a potent PROTEIN KINASE C inhibitor which enhances cAMP-mediated responses in human neuroblastoma cells. (Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1995;214(3):1114-20)

The introduction of new genes into cells for the purpose of treating disease by restoring or adding gene expression. Techniques include insertion of retroviral vectors, transfection, homologous recombination, and injection of new genes into the nuclei of single cell embryos. The entire gene therapy process may consist of multiple steps. The new genes may be introduced into proliferating cells in vivo (e.g., bone marrow) or in vitro (e.g., fibroblast cultures) and the modified cells transferred to the site where the gene expression is required. Gene therapy may be particularly useful for treating enzyme deficiency diseases, hemoglobinopathies, and leukemias and may also prove useful in restoring drug sensitivity, particularly for leukemia.

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A common neoplasm of early childhood arising from neural crest cells in the sympathetic nervous system, and characterized by diverse clinical behavior, ranging from spontaneous remission to rapid metastatic progression and death. This tumor is the most common intraabdominal malignancy of childhood, but it may also arise from thorax, neck, or rarely occur in the central nervous system. Histologic features include uniform round cells with hyperchromatic nuclei arranged in nests and separated by fibrovascular septa. Neuroblastomas may be associated with the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2099-2101; Curr Opin Oncol 1998 Jan;10(1):43-51)

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