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Treatment of Depression in Parkinson's Disease Trial

2014-08-27 03:55:11 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of two antidepressants--nortriptyline and paroxetine, compared to placebo in patients with Parkinson's disease and depression.

Description

Depression is the most common neuropsychiatric disorder found in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). It causes immense personal suffering and is associated with increased disability and caregiver burden.

Despite the adverse consequences of depression in patients with PD, there are virtually no empirical data to guide clinical treatment. This study will begin to answer some questions on the treatment of depression by testing a SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) antidepressant, paroxetine, a tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline, and placebo in a placebo-controlled trial.

A total of 75 patients with PD will be randomized to each of the three arms in a balanced design.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Parkinson Disease

Intervention

paroxetine, nortirptyline

Location

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
New Brunswick
New Jersey
United States
08854

Status

Completed

Source

University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:55:11-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Proteins associated with sporadic or familial cases of PARKINSON DISEASE.

A condition caused by the neurotoxin MPTP which causes selective destruction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Clinical features include irreversible parkinsonian signs including rigidity and bradykinesia (PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY). MPTP toxicity is also used as an animal model for the study of PARKINSON DISEASE. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1072; Neurology 1986 Feb;36(2):250-8)

A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA.

Parkinsonism following encephalitis, historically seen as a sequella of encephalitis lethargica (Von Economo Encephalitis). The early age of onset, the rapid progression of symptoms followed by stabilization, and the presence of a variety of other neurological disorders (e.g., sociopathic behavior; TICS; MUSCLE SPASMS; oculogyric crises; hyperphagia; and bizarre movements) distinguish this condition from primary PARKINSON DISEASE. Pathologic features include neuronal loss and gliosis concentrated in the MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMUS; and HYPOTHALAMUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p754)

Conditions which feature clinical manifestations resembling primary Parkinson disease that are caused by a known or suspected condition. Examples include parkinsonism caused by vascular injury, drugs, trauma, toxin exposure, neoplasms, infections and degenerative or hereditary conditions. Clinical features may include bradykinesia, rigidity, parkinsonian gait, and masked facies. In general, tremor is less prominent in secondary parkinsonism than in the primary form. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch38, pp39-42)

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