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Imatinib Mesylate to Treat Myeloproliferative Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

2014-08-27 03:55:52 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate (Gleevec(Trademark)) in reducing peripheral blood eosinophilia in patients with the myeloproliferative form of hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Patients with the hypereosinophilic syndrome who meet a set of criteria designed to select patients with the myeloproliferative form of the disease, as well as patients without myeloproliferative disease who are refractory to standard therapy for HES, will be admitted on this protocol. A thorough clinical evaluation will be performed with emphasis on potential sequelae of eosinophil-mediated tissue damage. A baseline bone marrow will be obtained to exclude leukemia or lymphoma and to assess the degree and nature of eosinophilopoiesis. Bone marrow, blood cells and/or serum will also be collected to test for the presence of a recently described mutation that is associated with imatinib-responsiveness in HES, and to provide reagents (such as DNA, RNA, and specific antibodies) and for use in the laboratory to address issues related to the mechanism of action of imatinib mesylate in HES. Imatinib mesylate will be initiated at a dose of 400 mg daily, the FDA-approved dose for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In patients who demonstrate a complete clinical and hematologic response to imatinib therapy and who do not have life-threatening disease, the dose will be decreased gradually to 100mg daily and then discontinued. In order to minimize bone marrow suppression, other myelosuppressive agents will be tapered and discontinued during the first week of therapy with imatinib mesylate. Complete blood counts will be performed weekly for the first month and biweekly thereafter. Clinical assessments will be performed every three months to assess progression of end organ damage.

In patients who demonstrate a complete clinical and hematologic response to imatinib therapy and who do not have life-threatening disease, the dose will be decreased gradually to 100 mg daily and then discontinued. In the event of clinical, hematologic or molecular relapse during the taper, the imatinib dose will be increased to a maximum of 600 mg daily to achieve a second remission. Laboratory monitoring will be performed as above except for molecular monitoring which will be monitored monthly if drug is discontinued or molecular relapse occurs. Once a stable dosing regimen is achieved for greater than or equal to 6 months in subjects who have undergone dose descalation or greater than or equal to 2 years in subjects receiving 300-400 mg of imatinib daily who did not qualify for dose de-escalation, the frequency of NIH visits and end organ assessments will be decreased to 6 months, with molecular monitoring every 3 months and monthly routine laboratory assessments.

Description

This study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of imatinib mesylate in reducing the number of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Patients with HES have elevated counts of eosinophils in the blood and body tissues, which can cause damage to these tissues. Although HES can involve any tissues, the heart, nerves, and skin are most often affected. Several drugs, including steroids, interferon, and hydroxyurea can lower eosinophil counts; however, these drugs have drawbacks in that they do not work in all patients with HES, or they may work only temporarily, or patients may develop side effects that require stopping the drugs. Imatinib mesylate is a new drug approved to treat gastrointestinal tumors and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Some data suggest that imatinib mesylate may be useful in treating a subgroup of patients with HES.

Patients with HES who are 18 years of age and older may be eligible for this study. Candidates will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, blood tests, electrocardiogram (EKG), echocardiogram (ultrasound examination of the heart), pulmonary (lung) function tests, eye exam and a bone marrow examination to determine if they fall into the subgroup of patients likely to respond to this therapy. For the bone marrow procedure, an area of skin and bone is numbed and a very sharp needle is inserted into the bone to draw out a sample of bone marrow for evaluation under the microscope.

Patients enrolled in the study will take imatinib mesylate daily. Any other drugs they may be taking for HES, as well as other drugs they are taking that may interact with imatinib mesylate, will be tapered and stopped. If it is not possible to stop taking certain drugs for other conditions, their dosages may be adjusted. Patients will be monitored weekly with laboratory testing during the first month of treatment and whenever neutrophil counts drop below 1500/mm3 or platelets fall below 100,000/mm3. If blood counts remain high enough, monitoring will be reduced to every 2 weeks for 3 months and once a month after that. Patients will have a clinic visit at NIH 1 month after beginning the drug for a clinical and laboratory evaluation, including a repeat bone marrow examination. Patients whose eosinophil counts are not lowered after 4 weeks of treatment will leave the study. Those who respond to therapy will return to NIH every 3 months for a history and physical examination, laboratory tests, EKG, echocardiogram, and pulmonary function testing to determine how treatment is affecting disease progression. In some participants with stable disease where an optimal dose of imatinib mesylate has been identified, visits may be extended to every six months. In addition, the following procedures will be done solely for research purposes:

- Blood tests to determine the effects of imatinib mesylate on immune cells, including eosinophils.

- Leukapheresis to study the effects of imatinib mesylate on eosinophils: For this procedure, whole blood is collected through a needle in an arm vein, similar to donating blood. The blood circulates through a machine that separates it into its components, and the white cells are removed. The rest of the blood is returned to the body, either through the same needle or through another needle in the other arm.

- Bone marrow examinations will be done during the screening tests and again 1 month after starting treatment to look at newly developing cells in the bone marrow.

- Genetic testing to determine how imatinib mesylate is able to lower eosinophil counts in patients with HES.

Study Design

Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

Intervention

Imatinib Mesylate

Location

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda
Maryland
United States
20892

Status

Recruiting

Source

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:55:52-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A tyrosine kinase inhibitor and ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENT that inhibits the BCR-ABL kinase created by chromosome rearrangements in CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA and ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA, as well as PDG-derived tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

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Natural product isolated from Streptomyces pilosus. It forms iron complexes and is used as a chelating agent, particularly in the mesylate form.

A pyrimidine and thiazole derived ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENT and PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITOR of BCR-ABL KINASE. It is used in the treatment of patients with CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA who are resistant or intolerant to IMATINIB.

Condition with a variable constellation of phenotypes due to deletion polymorphisms at chromosome location 22q11. It encompasses several syndromes with overlapping abnormalities including the DIGEORGE SYNDROME, VELOCARDIOFACIAL SYNDROME, and CONOTRUNCAL AMOMALY FACE SYNDROME. In addition, variable developmental problems and schizoid features are also associated with this syndrome. (From BMC Med Genet. 2009 Feb 25;10:16) Not all deletions at 22q11 result in the 22q11deletion syndrome.

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