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Evaluation and Treatment of Patients With Inherited Eye Diseases

2014-08-27 03:57:04 | BioPortfolio

Summary

This study offers evaluation and treatment for patients with inherited (genetic) eye diseases. The protocol is not designed to test new treatments; rather, patients will receive current standard of care treatments. The purpose of the study is twofold: 1) to allow National Eye (NEI) Institute physicians to increase their knowledge of various genetic eye diseases, identify possible new avenues of research in this area, and maintain their clinical skills; and 2) to establish a pool of patients who may be eligible for new studies as they are developed. (Participants in this protocol will not be required to join a new study; the decision will be voluntary.)

Children and adults with genetic eye diseases may be eligible for this study. Candidates will be screened with a medical and family history, thorough eye examination and blood test. The eye examination includes measurements of eye pressure and visual acuity (ability to see the vision chart) and dilation of the pupils with eye drops to examine the lens and retina (back part of the eye). Patients may also undergo additional diagnostic tests needed to determine eligibility for other NEI studies, including routine laboratory testing, imaging, questionnaires, a physical examination, and other standard and specialized tests and procedures as needed. In addition, patients will have special photographs taken of the eye to document the clarity or opacity of the eye lens. They will also undergo a procedure called electroretinography to assess the eye's response to bright lights. For this procedure, the eye is numbed with anesthetic drops and a contact lens is placed in the eye. The patient looks inside a large, hollow sphere and sees flashes of light, first in darkness and then in light. The contact lenses sense small electrical signals generated by the retina.

Patients who need medical care will be given appropriate standard medical treatment. Those who are found eligible for a research study will be recommended for participation in that study and taken off this one.

Participants will be followed at least 3 years. Follow-up visits are scheduled according to the standard of care for the individual patient's eye problem. Patients in this protocol will probably have 1 to 3 follow-up visits per year.

Description

This "Evaluation and Treatment Protocol" will allow the geneticists and ophthalmic genetic specialists at the NEI to identify, follow and provide "standard of care" treatment to patients with genetic eye disease. The primary purpose of the protocol is to accumulate a cohort of patients with genetic eye disease for possible participation in NEI studies. A secondary purpose is to provide long-term follow-up and treatment for a variety of genetic eye diseases so that the genetic specialists at NEI will be better able to identify research hypotheses about these diseases in addition to maintaining their clinical skills. The availability of cohorts of patients with a spectrum of genetic disorders will be valuable for the training of fellows in ophthalmic genetics, an important mission of the NEI. Finally, the ability to provide long-term follow-up and care will also facilitate referral efforts for new NEI protocols.

The genetic specialists at the National Eye Institute will be free to choose those genetic conditions that interest them. However, the total number of patients that can be enrolled in the protocol will be restricted. This protocol is not designed to test any new treatments. Any evaluations or treatment under this protocol will be based on the current standard of care for each genetic condition.

Participants in this patient evaluation and treatment protocol will be evaluated for potential eligibility in any new NEI clinical studies as they are developed. If eligible, patients may be asked to participate in the new protocol. However, they will not be required to enter any protocol and their decision to participate will be entirely voluntary. No more than 150 patients will be accepted in this "Evaluation and Treatment Protocol."

Study Design

N/A

Conditions

Hereditary Eye Disease

Location

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda
Maryland
United States
20892

Status

Completed

Source

National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:57:04-0400

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