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Parkinson's Disease Treatment With Coenzyme Q10

2014-08-27 03:58:13 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of varying dosage of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) versus a placebo in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients with early, untreated PD.

Description

Four groups of 20 subjects/group of subjects will be randomly assigned to receive CoQ10 (at doses of 300, 600 or 1200 mg/day) or matching placebo. A subject must have early PD that does not require treatment. A subject will be evaluated at a Screening Visit, a Baseline Visit (after which the subject begins to take the study drug) and visits at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 months after the baseline visit. The subject will be followed until she/he needs treatment with levodopa or for a maximum of 16 months. Because CoQ10 is a component of the mitochondria (the part of a cell that makes energy), blood samples will be taken at the baseline visit and the last visit to study mitochondrial function.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Double-Blind, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Parkinson's Disease

Intervention

Coenzyme Q10

Location

University of Rochester
Rochester
New York
United States
14620

Status

Completed

Source

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:58:13-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Proteins associated with sporadic or familial cases of PARKINSON DISEASE.

A condition caused by the neurotoxin MPTP which causes selective destruction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Clinical features include irreversible parkinsonian signs including rigidity and bradykinesia (PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY). MPTP toxicity is also used as an animal model for the study of PARKINSON DISEASE. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1072; Neurology 1986 Feb;36(2):250-8)

A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA.

Parkinsonism following encephalitis, historically seen as a sequella of encephalitis lethargica (Von Economo Encephalitis). The early age of onset, the rapid progression of symptoms followed by stabilization, and the presence of a variety of other neurological disorders (e.g., sociopathic behavior; TICS; MUSCLE SPASMS; oculogyric crises; hyperphagia; and bizarre movements) distinguish this condition from primary PARKINSON DISEASE. Pathologic features include neuronal loss and gliosis concentrated in the MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMUS; and HYPOTHALAMUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p754)

Conditions which feature clinical manifestations resembling primary Parkinson disease that are caused by a known or suspected condition. Examples include parkinsonism caused by vascular injury, drugs, trauma, toxin exposure, neoplasms, infections and degenerative or hereditary conditions. Clinical features may include bradykinesia, rigidity, parkinsonian gait, and masked facies. In general, tremor is less prominent in secondary parkinsonism than in the primary form. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch38, pp39-42)

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