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Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Advanced Recurrent Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

2014-08-27 03:58:28 | BioPortfolio

Summary

RATIONALE: Monoclonal antibodies can locate cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop cancer cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to damage cancer cells. Peripheral stem cell transplantation may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy used to kill cancer cells.

PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody therapy, cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation in treating patients who have advanced recurrent acute lymphocytic leukemia.

Description

OBJECTIVES: I. Assess the efficacy and toxicity of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8, cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation in patients with advanced acute lymphocytic leukemia who are receiving HLA matched related or unrelated bone marrow transplantation. II. Determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8 in these patients. III. Estimate the MTD of radiation delivered by iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8 to the marrow. IV. Study the influence of marrow cellularity, level of antigen expression by leukemic cells, and degree of antigen saturation by antibody on the biodistribution of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8 in these patients.

OUTLINE: This is a dose-escalation study. All patients receive a test dose of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8 (MOAB BC8) IV over several hours 6-14 days prior to the therapeutic dose. Patients receive the therapeutic dose of iodine I 131 MOAB BC8 IV over several hours on day -11, total body irradiation over 30-40 minutes twice a day on days -6 to -4, and cyclophosphamide IV over 1 hour on days -3 and -2. Patients undergo allogenic bone marrow transplantation on day 0. Patients receive intrathecal methotrexate twice prior to transplantation and then every other week for 4 weeks beginning on day 32 posttransplant. Cohorts of 4 patients receive escalating doses of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is determined. The MTD is defined as the dose preceding that at which 2 of 4 patients experience dose-limiting toxicity. Patients are followed for the first 100 days, at 6, 9 and 12 months, every 6 months for 1 year, and then annually thereafter.

PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 40 patients will be accrued for this study within 4 years.

Study Design

Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Leukemia

Intervention

cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody BC8, radiation therapy

Location

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle
Washington
United States
98109

Status

Completed

Source

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:58:28-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.

A cell-separation technique where magnetizable microspheres or beads are first coated with monoclonal antibody, allowed to search and bind to target cells, and are then selectively removed when passed through a magnetic field. Among other applications, the technique is commonly used to remove tumor cells from the marrow (BONE MARROW PURGING) of patients who are to undergo autologous bone marrow transplantation.

Agents that destroy bone marrow activity. They are used to prepare patients for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION or STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.

The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.

Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.

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