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Gene Therapy in HIV-Positive Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

2014-08-27 03:59:14 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this study is to see if it is safe and effective to use gene therapy to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-positive patients.

Stem cell transplantation is a procedure used to treat NHL. Stem cells are very immature cells that develop to create all of the different types of blood cells. In this study, some of your stem cells will be treated with gene therapy, meaning the cells are treated with a virus that does not cause disease. Some cells will receive a virus that contains ribozymes, enzymes that may help fight HIV. Other cells will be treated with a virus that does not contain ribozymes to see how the virus works alone. Some cells will not be treated at all. Doctors would like to see whether giving patients stem cells with ribozymes can treat NHL and stop HIV from growing at the same time.

Description

In this study, CD34+ cells (stem cells) are transduced with a retroviral vector construct that incorporates multiple ribozymes, a form of RNA with the ability to selectively inhibit gene expression, targeting different sites within the HIV virus. These transduced cells are reinfused into patients as part of a bone marrow transplant procedure for AIDS/lymphoma.

Patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation are entered into this study. A "neutral" retrovirus named "LN" and a retrovirus that contains two ribozyme sequences named "L-TR/Tat-neo" are introduced into the patient's PBPC. The L-TR/Tat-neo retrovirus has been shown in tissue culture experiments to inhibit the replication of HIV. The LN retrovirus serves as an internal control to examine selective advantage of the gene therapy. Patients have a bone marrow sample taken. After an additional round of chemotherapy with their referring physician, patients receive daily injections of G-CSF to aid in the collection of stem cells. Daily stem cell collections are performed. It is anticipated that three to four collections will be required, but as many as six may be necessary. To prepare for the transplantation of stem cells, patients are admitted for a 7-day series of intensive chemotherapy. Following this conditioning, the gene-modified and untreated stem cells are infused back into the patient. The collected cells are divided into three pools. One is set aside without modification, one is modified with the LN control vector, and one is modified with the L-TR/Tat-neo construct. The LN and L-TR/Tat-neo samples are pooled and given to the patient by IV infusion over about 15 minutes. The unmodified cells are then infused over 10 to 15 minutes. Patients remain in the hospital until their blood cells return to adequate levels and they are well enough to be released. Following transplantation, all patients are followed at Months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24. Because of the experimental nature of gene therapy, patients are followed periodically throughout their lifetimes.

Study Design

Endpoint Classification: Safety Study, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin

Intervention

Peripheral blood stem cells

Location

City of Hope Natl Med Ctr
Duarte
California
United States
91010

Status

Completed

Source

NIH AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:59:14-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Two or more distinct types of malignant lymphoid tumors occurring within a single organ or tissue at the same time. It may contain different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells or both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells.

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Clinically benign, histologically malignant, recurrent cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by an infiltration of large atypical cells surrounded by inflammatory cells. The atypical cells resemble REED-STERNBERG CELLS of HODGKIN DISEASE or the malignant cells of CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA. In some cases, lymphomatoid papulosis progresses to lymphomatous conditions including MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES; HODGKIN DISEASE; CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA; or ANAPLASTIC LARGE-CELL LYMPHOMA.

A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma having a usually diffuse pattern with both small and medium lymphocytes and small cleaved cells. It accounts for about 5% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States and Europe. The majority of mantle-cell lymphomas are associated with a t(11;14) translocation resulting in overexpression of the CYCLIN D1 gene (GENES, BCL-1).

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