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Pelvic Floor Muscle Training and Kaatsu Training for Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence

2016-02-08 19:08:22 | BioPortfolio

Summary

This study examines the effect of adding so called Kaatsu training to pelvic floor muscle training. Half the participants will perform Kaatsu training on their thigh muscles followed by pelvic floor muscle training. The other half will receive pelvic floor muscle training alone.

Description

Stress urinary incontinence (SU) is a common problem among adult women . Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is recommended as first line treatment but PFMT is not always efficient and some women cannot comply with the intensive PFMT needed to obtain effect because of weakened or damaged muscles caused by vaginal delivery and age related changes.

Hypothetically alternative methods could be used to enhance the effect of a strength-training program. A low intensity training program with a simultaneous partial occlusion of the blood supply for the training muscle, so called "Kaatsu" training has been found to increase muscle strength faster than ordinary strength training but with much less effort. It seems difficult to make occlusion of the pelvic floor muscles during PFMT but a study found that low intensity training of the quadriceps femoris with partial occlusion of the blood supply did not only increase muscle strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle but also of the biceps humeri muscle if that muscle was trained with low-load training and no occlusion in the same training session. The specific reason for this this "cross-transfer effect" could not be fully explained but it was believed to be caused by a systemic effect caused by growth hormones. The aim of this study is therefore to examine if Kaatsu training offered in relation to a low-load PFMT program can increase the effect of PFMT in women with SUI

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Single Blind (Investigator), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Urinary Stress Incontinence

Intervention

Pelvic floor muscle training and Kaatsu, Pelvic floor muscle training

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

Herlev Hospital

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2016-02-08T19:08:22-0500

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