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Topical BPM31510 3.0% Cream in Patients With Epidermolysis Bullosa

2016-06-09 16:25:24 | BioPortfolio

Published on BioPortfolio: 2016-06-09T16:25:24-0400

Clinical Trials [1144 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Study of Alwextin® Cream in Treating Epidermolysis Bullosa

The purpose of this study is to determine how safe and effective Alwextin (3% allantoin) cream is in improving the healing of recurrent skin lesions and reducing overall blistering in peop...

Study of Efficacy and Safety of SD-101 Cream in Patients With Epidermolysis Bullosa

The aim is to assess the efficacy and safety of SD-101-6.0 cream versus SD-101-0.0 (placebo) in the treatment of patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa.

Open Label Extension Study to Evaluate the Long-term Safety of Zorblisa (SD-101-6.0) in Patients With Epidermolysis Bullosa

The aim is to assess the long-term safety of topical use of ZORBLISA in patients with Epidemolysis Bullosa.

Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy Study of RGN-137 Topical Gel for Junctional and Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of RGN-137 topical gel with that of placebo gel for treatment of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or dystrophic epid...

Evaluation of the Efficacy of ROPIVACAINE in Children and Young Adults With Hereditary Epidermolysis Bullosa

The purpose of this study is to determine whether topical application of Ropivacaine is effective for treating refractory pain during dressing changes and so improve quality of life of pat...

PubMed Articles [738 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Topical sucralfate cream treatment for aplasia cutis congenita with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a case study.

Bart syndrome consists of aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and dominant or recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), associated with skin fragility and nail dysplasia. ACC in DEB is thought to be...

Topical Diacerein Cream for Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex: A Review

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare mucocutaneous fragility disorders often presenting in infancy and early childhood with painful blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. The severity o...

Consensus on the treatment of autoimmune bullous dermatoses: bullous pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita - Brazilian Society of Dermatology.

Bullous pemphigoid, mucous membrane pemphigoid and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita are subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases whose antigenic target is located at the basement membrane zone. Muco...

Extended Wear Bandage Contact Lenses Decrease Pain and Preserve Vision in Patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa: Case Series and Review of Literature.

To demonstrate the therapeutic benefit of extended wear bandage contact lens (BCL) use in patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) suffering from recurrent, painful, and slow-to-heal corneal epithelia...

Treatment of keratinocytes with 4-phenylbutyrate in epidermolysis bullosa: Lessons for therapies in keratin disorders.

Missense mutations in keratin 5 and 14 genes cause the severe skin fragility disorder epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) by collapsing of the keratin cytoskeleton into cytoplasmic protein aggregates....

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by serous bullae that heal without scarring. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-5 and KERATIN-14 have been associated with several subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.

Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by atrophy of blistered areas, severe scarring, and nail changes. It is most often present at birth or in early infancy and occurs in both autosomal dominant and recessive forms. All forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa result from mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE VII, a major component fibrils of BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPIDERMIS.

Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by trauma-induced, subepidermal blistering with no family history of the disease. Direct immunofluorescence shows IMMUNOGLOBULIN G deposited at the dermo-epidermal junction.

Form of epidermolysis bullosa having onset at birth or during the neonatal period and transmitted through autosomal recessive inheritance. It is characterized by generalized blister formation, extensive denudation, and separation and cleavage of the basal cell plasma membranes from the basement membrane.

Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.

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