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ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

2017-02-28 15:38:22 | BioPortfolio

Summary

In the U.S. alone, over 300,000 people per year have sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and less than 1 out of 10 survive. The current standard practice for treating OHCA is to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) at the scene until either the heart is restarted or resuscitation efforts are considered hopeless and discontinued. An alternative strategy for those with refractory OHCA is expedited transport with ongoing mechanical CPR to an Emergency Department capable of performing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The purpose of study is to test if this strategy is feasible and beneficial.

Description

Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a life-threatening condition in which the heart suddenly stops beating and there is no blood flow to the body. If cardiac arrest is not treated immediately, it causes sudden death. In the U.S. alone, over 300,000 people per year have OHCA, and less than 1 out of 10 survive. Therefore, it is important to study new ways of treating cardiac arrest patients in order to improve survival.

The current standard practice for treating OHCA is to perform CPR and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) at the scene until either the heart is restarted or resuscitation efforts are considered hopeless and discontinued. This practice is supported by the fact that all currently proven CPR therapies can be delivered by paramedics in the field.

However, promising new strategies have emerged that are more feasible to initiate in the hospital. One such strategy is extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). ECPR requires placement of catheters in large blood vessels and connected to a machine to take over the work of the heart and lungs.

This purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and potential benefit of expedited transport with ongoing mechanical CPR for patients with refractory OHCA patients to an Emergency Department capable of initiating ECPR.

Study Design

Conditions

Cardiac Arrest

Intervention

Expedited Transport With Mechanical CPR

Location

University of Michigan Hospital
Ann Arbor
Michigan
United States
48109

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

University of Michigan

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2017-02-28T15:38:22-0500

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PubMed Articles [9590 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.

The omission of atrial activation that is caused by transient cessation of impulse generation at the SINOATRIAL NODE. It is characterized by a prolonged pause without P wave in an ELECTROCARDIOGRAM. Sinus arrest has been associated with sleep apnea (REM SLEEP-RELATED SINUS ARREST).

Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.

A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.

Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.

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