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StandUP UBC: Reducing Workplace Sitting

2017-12-22 11:03:08 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Research indicates that sedentary behaviours, such as prolonged sitting, have negative health consequences and increases risk for disease. Unfortunately, many office-workers spend a high proportion of their workday sitting, often in prolonged unbroken bouts. Recent interventions have provided active workstations (e.g., sit-stand desks) to reduce employee sitting. However, cost prohibits provision of these desks in work environments. There is a need for low-cost solutions to reduce sitting at work. The purpose of this study is to determine whether provision of a low-cost standing desk reduces workplace sitting, and results in improvements in work engagement and fatigue, compared to usual practice.

Description

Study objectives: This study aims to provide a cost-effective solution to reducing sitting time during the workday, through provision of (1) low-cost cardboard standing desks ($20), and (2) simple behaviour change strategies (e.g., instruction on how to break up sitting time and information on the health consequences of doing so).

Background: Sedentary behaviour, defined as 'any waking behaviour characterised by an energy expenditure ≤1.5 metabolic equivalents while in a sitting, reclining, or lying posture', is a risk factor for poor health, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). High levels of sedentary behaviour and excessive bouts of prolonged sitting is associated with increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

Sedentary behaviours are prevalent among Canadian adults, who often spend a large proportion of their waking hours sitting (e.g., work, commuting, watching TV), and office workers have been identified as one of the most sedentary occupational groups. Sedentary behaviour can be reduced by replacing sitting time with standing or light ambulation. In order to do so, it is vital to create an environment that makes sitting less likely and standing/moving easier. There is some evidence that introduction of sit-stand desks can reduce occupational sitting time within office environments ; however, there are cost barriers to the provision of these desks in work environments and few randomized control trials have demonstrated the long-term compliance and effectiveness of these desks on health- (e.g., weight, waist circumference, blood-derived biomarkers, musculoskeletal symptoms, fatigue) and work-related (e.g., work performance/productivity) outcomes. These are important factors that need to be considered and studied in further detail to quantify the benefit of sit-stand workstations.

Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of a low-cost intervention aimed at reducing workplace sitting time in office workers.

Primary objectives:

• To evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention at reducing daily occupational sitting time over 6 months.

Secondary objectives:

• To explore whether the intervention results in improvements in work engagement and productivity, and occupational fatigue.

Methods/Design: The intervention will be delivered and evaluated over a 6-month period. This study is a two-arm randomized waitlist-controlled trial with one intervention group and one control group. After eligibility assessment, individuals will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or the control arm. The experimental group participants will receive a low-cost cardboard standing desk converter in their regular office environment and behaviour change strategies to break up sitting time, while the control group participants will not encounter any change to their regular work environments or be provided with any behaviour change strategies.

Intervention for experimental group:

Each participant allocated to the experimental group will receive a low-cost, cardboard, fixed-height standing desk converter (https://oristand.co/) that will be placed in their regular office environment, along with their usual sitting desk. The participants will be instructed on how to use the fixed-height standing desk converter (herein referred to as standing desk) as a way to break up sitting time every 30 minutes. In addition, each participant will be provided with information about the health benefits of breaking up sitting time.

Waitlist Control group:

Control group participants will not encounter any changes to their regular office environment. They will be provided with the standing desk and behaviour change strategies 6-months post-intervention.

Study Design

Conditions

Sedentary Lifestyle

Intervention

Standing desk intervention, Waitlist control

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

University of British Columbia

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2017-12-22T11:03:08-0500

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Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.

A study in which observations are made before and after an intervention, both in a group that receives the intervention and in a control group that does not.

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Clinical trials involving one or more test treatments, at least one control treatment, specified outcome measures for evaluating the studied intervention, and a bias-free method for assigning patients to the test treatment. The treatment may be drugs, devices, or procedures studied for diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic effectiveness. Control measures include placebos, active medicines, no-treatment, dosage forms and regimens, historical comparisons, etc. When randomization using mathematical techniques, such as the use of a random numbers table, is employed to assign patients to test or control treatments, the trials are characterized as RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS AS TOPIC.

A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.

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