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Continuous Spinal Anesthesia in Renal Transplantation

2018-02-21 19:15:11 | BioPortfolio

Published on BioPortfolio: 2018-02-21T19:15:11-0500

Clinical Trials [6582 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Continuous Spinal Anesthesia Versus Combined Spinal Epidural Block

In major orthopaedic surgery of the lower extremities both continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE) are safe and reliable anaesthesia methods. Our r...

Spinal Versus General Anesthesia for Ambulatory Anesthesia

The purpose of this study is to describe, in real-life conditions, the factors influencing the choice of anesthesia (spinal anesthesia or short general anesthesia) in outpatient surgery.

Combined Plexus Block for Hip Fracture Surgery.

Hip fracture surgery requires high risk anesthetic procedure for elderly patients (1). General anesthesia, continuous spinal anesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks are three anesthetic tec...

Spinal Anesthesia Associated With General Anesthesia in Coronary Artery Bypass

CONTEXT: In patients eligible for coronary artery bypass surgery, anesthesia should provide a number of conditions that exceed the limits of cardiovascular stability, myocardial protection...

Cerebral and Renal Oxymetry and Anesthetic Techniques in Newborns

Neonatal adaptation to extrauterine life has many physiological changes in neonatal organ systems. These adaptative changes may be affected such as type of delivery and anesthesia manageme...

PubMed Articles [20241 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Readiness for Discharge After Foot and Ankle Surgery Using Peripheral Nerve Blocks: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Spinal and General Anesthesia as Supplements to Nerve Blocks.

Neuraxial anesthesia is often viewed as superior to general anesthesia but may delay discharge. Comparisons do not typically use multimodal analgesics and nerve blockade. Combining nerve blockade with...

Ultrasound-Assisted Technology Versus the Conventional Landmark Location Method in Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery in Obese Parturients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Spinal anesthesia, which is commonly used in cesarean deliveries, is often difficult to perform in obese parturients because of poorly palpable surface landmarks and positioning challenges. This study...

Popular Literature as an Educational Aid for History of Anesthesia.

History of anesthesia can be learned through formal didactic lectures, discussions, tours, audiovisual media, general anesthesia textbooks, anesthesia history texts, and by popular literature.

Ultrasound-guided posterior ramus of spinal nerve block for anesthesia and analgesia in lumbar spinal surgery.

Cauda equina syndrome following an uneventful spinal anesthesia in a patient undergoing drainage of the Bartholin abscess: A case report.

Neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used type of regional anesthesia. Cauda equina syndrome is an unusual and severe complication of neuraxial anesthesia, and is caused by damage to the sacral roots of...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Abnormally slow pace of regaining CONSCIOUSNESS after general anesthesia (ANESTHESIA, GENERAL) usually given during surgical procedures. This condition is characterized by persistent somnolence.

The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.

A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration, for the induction of general anesthesia, or for inducing a hypnotic state. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p919)

A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)

Agents that induce various degrees of analgesia; depression of consciousness, circulation, and respiration; relaxation of skeletal muscle; reduction of reflex activity; and amnesia. There are two types of general anesthetics, inhalation and intravenous. With either type, the arterial concentration of drug required to induce anesthesia varies with the condition of the patient, the desired depth of anesthesia, and the concomitant use of other drugs. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p.173)

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