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A Prospective Case Series Evaluating Surgimend Mp® In Patients Undergoing Complex Abdominal Hernia Repair

2018-03-06 21:56:17 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Large abdominal wall hernias are surgically challenging to repair and often associated with significant postoperative complications. Risk factors associated with surgical site complications, such as infection and wound dehiscence, include obesity, diabetes, and smoking. In these high risk patients, the placement of synthetic mesh increases the risk of mesh infection, enterocutaneous fistula formation, and mesh explantation. One of the larger studies of risk factors associated with mesh explantation demonstrated concomitant intra-abdominal procedures have a greater than 6-fold increased hazard of subsequent mesh explantation. As an alternative to synthetic meshes, bioprosthetic meshes derived from the decellularization and processing of allogeneic or xenogeneic tissue sources have been introduced that can often allow the surgeon to treat the surgical site occurrences and salvage the repair without required mesh explantation. Low rates of mesh infection and explantation have been reported for bioprosthetic meshes and are recommended in these complicated patients by the Ventral Hernia Working Group, based on the best available clinical evidence. Despite widespread use of bioprosthetic mesh, there continues to be concern for complications associated with their use (i.e. high seroma and recurrence rates, etc.). This has led to the modification of these matrices by several industry leaders (Acelity, Cook, Integra, etc.) to include a fenestrated platform to allow for fluid to flow through the matrix upon implantation while supporting regeneration in complex abdominal wall reconstruction. To our knowledge, there are no clinical studies prospectively evaluating the long term clinical outcomes for abdominal wall reconstruction procedures involving fenestrated macropourous biologic matrices.This macroporous technology allows for tissue revascularization and integration of the biologic graft and thus an expected improvement in overall outcome. Bioprosthetic fenestrated materials such as Surgimend MP® were developed to assist with earlier incorporation and vascularization of the biologic graft while providing reinforcement of hernia repair. However, there is an absence of high quality prospective data regarding the use of these materials in complicated abdominal wall reconstruction, and no comparative data exists.

This study is a prospective, case series study evaluating the efficacy and performance of SurgiMend MP® during complex ventral hernia repairs. This case series involves a biologically derived hernia mesh under its cleared FDA indication for hernia repair. Efficacy will be determined by quantifying surgical complications, hernia recurrence, and cost effectiveness endpoints.

Description

Large abdominal wall hernias are surgically challenging to repair and often associated with significant postoperative complications. Risk factors associated with surgical site complications, such as infection and wound dehiscence, include obesity, diabetes, and smoking. In these high risk patients, the placement of synthetic mesh increases the risk of mesh infection, enterocutaneous fistula formation, and mesh explantation. One of the larger studies of risk factors associated with mesh explantation demonstrated concomitant intra-abdominal procedures have a greater than 6-fold increased hazard of subsequent mesh explantation. As an alternative to synthetic meshes, bioprosthetic meshes derived from the decellularization and processing of allogeneic or xenogeneic tissue sources have been introduced that can often allow the surgeon to treat the surgical site occurrences and salvage the repair without required mesh explantation. Low rates of mesh infection and explantation have been reported for bioprosthetic meshes and are recommended in these complicated patients by the Ventral Hernia Working Group, based on the best available clinical evidence. Despite widespread use of bioprosthetic mesh, there continues to be concern for complications associated with their use (i.e. high seroma and recurrence rates, etc.). This has led to the modification of these matrices by several industry leaders (Acelity, Cook, Integra, etc.) to include a fenestrated platform to allow for fluid to flow through the matrix upon implantation while supporting regeneration in complex abdominal wall reconstruction. To our knowledge, there are no clinical studies prospectively evaluating the long term clinical outcomes for abdominal wall reconstruction procedures involving fenestrated macropourous biologic matrices.This macroporous technology allows for tissue revascularization and integration of the biologic graft and thus an expected improvement in overall outcome. Bioprosthetic fenestrated materials such as Surgimend MP® were developed to assist with earlier incorporation and vascularization of the biologic graft while providing reinforcement of hernia repair. However, there is an absence of high quality prospective data regarding the use of these materials in complicated abdominal wall reconstruction, and no comparative data exists.

This study is a prospective, case series study evaluating the efficacy and performance of SurgiMend MP® during complex ventral hernia repairs. This case series involves a biologically derived hernia mesh under its cleared FDA indication for hernia repair. Efficacy will be determined by quantifying surgical complications, hernia recurrence, and cost effectiveness endpoints.

Subjects will be identified by the investigators and/or personnel assigned by the investigators, as patients with large complex ventral hernia expected to be repaired with bioprosthetic mesh.

Subjects will have a baseline visit where they will have a physical exam and complete quality of life questionnaires and a pain scale. Photographs will be taken at this visit as well. Demographic and medical and surgical history will be collected. The investigators will then assess the subject intra-operatively to confirm the need and appropriate placement of SurgiMend mesh. The subjects that have mesh placed will be followed at hospital discharge, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months to assess for changes in health, adverse events, questionnaire completion, and evaluation of surgical site for complications and recurrence. The visits may take place by phone if the subject cannot return to clinic.

Study Design

Conditions

Hernia, Ventral

Intervention

SurgiMend® MP

Location

Barnes Jewish Hospital
Saint Louis
Missouri
United States
63110

Status

Recruiting

Source

Washington University School of Medicine

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2018-03-06T21:56:17-0500

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.

A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.

A pelvic hernia through the obturator foramen, a large aperture in the hip bone normally covered by a membrane. Obturator hernia can lead to intestinal incarceration and INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.

A groin hernia occurring inferior to the inguinal ligament and medial to the FEMORAL VEIN and FEMORAL ARTERY. The femoral hernia sac has a small neck but may enlarge considerably when it enters the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh. It is caused by defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL.

A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.

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