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Gentamicin for Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa

2018-05-21 18:19:10 | BioPortfolio

Published on BioPortfolio: 2018-05-21T18:19:10-0400

Clinical Trials [344 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy Study of RGN-137 Topical Gel for Junctional and Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of RGN-137 topical gel with that of placebo gel for treatment of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or dystrophic epid...

Safety and Efficacy of Apligraf in Nonhealing Wounds of Subjects With Junctional or Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of Apligraf for the treatment of nonhealing wounds in subjects with dystrophic or junctional epidermolysis bullosa. Apligraf will be evalu...

Clinical Trial to Assess Safety and Efficacy of Autologous Cultured Epidermal Grafts Containing Epidermal Stem Cells Genetically Modified in Patients With JEB (HOLOGENE17)

Prospective open-label, uncontrolled clinical study to assess the safety and efficacy of autologous cultured epidermal grafts containing epidermal stem cells genetically modified with the ...

Intravenous Gentamicin Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (RDEB)

Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an incurable, devastating, inherited skin disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene that encodes for type VII collagen (C7), the m...

Gentamicin Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (RDEB) Nonsense Mutation Patients

Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an incurable, devastating, inherited skin disease for which there is only supportive care. RDEB is due to mutations in COL7A1 gene that...

PubMed Articles [1072 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Palliative Sedation with Oral Medicines in an Infant with Generalized Severe Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa.

Generalized severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a rare mechanobullous skin disorder that is uniformly fatal. We present the case of an infant who received palliative pain management and ultimat...

Epidermal aspects of type VII collagen: Implications for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

Type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils in the epidermal basement membrane zone, has been characterized as a defective protein in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and as an au...

A comprehensive next-generation sequencing assay for the diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa.

Historically, diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa has required skin biopsies for electron microscopy, direct immunofluorescence to determine which gene(s) to choose for genetic testing, or both.

Epidermolysis bullosa: management complexities for paediatric patients.

The genetic skin condition, epidermolysis bullosa (EB) causes the skin to be fragile and blister. As a result, blisters need to be lanced and the skin needs to be dressed with specialist dressings for...

Cultured allogeneic fibroblast injection versus fibroblasts cultured on amniotic membrane scaffold for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treatment.

Different methods of fibroblast application have been examined to treat recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB).

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Form of epidermolysis bullosa having onset at birth or during the neonatal period and transmitted through autosomal recessive inheritance. It is characterized by generalized blister formation, extensive denudation, and separation and cleavage of the basal cell plasma membranes from the basement membrane.

A form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by serous bullae that heal without scarring. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-5 and KERATIN-14 have been associated with several subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.

Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by atrophy of blistered areas, severe scarring, and nail changes. It is most often present at birth or in early infancy and occurs in both autosomal dominant and recessive forms. All forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa result from mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE VII, a major component fibrils of BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPIDERMIS.

Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by trauma-induced, subepidermal blistering with no family history of the disease. Direct immunofluorescence shows IMMUNOGLOBULIN G deposited at the dermo-epidermal junction.

Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.

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