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Umbrella Review and Updated Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Pulses/Legumes and Incident Cardiometabolic Diseases

2018-06-19 02:41:11 | BioPortfolio

Published on BioPortfolio: 2018-06-19T02:41:11-0400

Clinical Trials [1798 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Meta-analyses of the Effect of Legumes on Blood Pressure

Legumes are generally recognized as healthy dietary components, and although beans and legumes are recommended in food guidelines in North America, guidelines vary in regards to how much a...

Meta-analyses of the Effect of Dietary Pulses on Acute Postprandial Metabolic Control

Dietary pulses (beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils), more commonly known as "legumes", are generally recognized as healthy components of the diet. Canada's Food Guide encourages consumpti...

Effects of Dietary Protein Intake From Beef/Pork and Soy/Legumes on Appetite, Mood, and Weight Loss

The primary aims of this study are to assess the effects of habitual dietary protein intakes across the acceptable macronutrient distribution range with lean beef/pork or soy/legumes as th...

Low Glycemic Index Diets (With Pulses) in Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy individuals with type 2 diabetes will receive intensive counseling on food selection to improve glucose control using either high cereal fiber dietary strategies or low glycemic in...

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)

To test the effectiveness of dietary patterns in lowering blood pressure.

PubMed Articles [14018 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

Enhancing nutrition with pulses: defining a recommended serving size for adults.

Pulses, defined as dry-harvested leguminous crops, include several varieties of beans, peas, lentils, and chickpeas. There is no consensus around a recommended serving size of pulses within a balanced...

Legume consumption and risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in the PREDIMED study.

Limited prospective studies have examined the association between legumes consumption and mortality, whereas scarce, if at all, previous studies have evaluated such associations taking into considerat...

Dietary Supplements with Antiplatelet Activity: A Solution for Everyone?

Dietary supplements can have beneficial effects on a number of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and interest in the use of nonpharmacologic nutraceutical-based treatments for cardiovascular d...

Differential lipid metabolism outcomes associated with ADRB2 gene polymorphisms in response to two dietary interventions in overweight/obese subjects.

A precise nutrigenetic management of hypercholesterolemia involves the understanding of the interactions between the individual's genotype and dietary intake. The aim of this study was to analyze the ...

Dietary Antioxidants and Health Promotion.

Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be the root cause of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, an...

Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)

A nutritional plan based on the presumed diet of pre-agricultural human ancestors. It consists mainly of MEAT, EGGS, NUTS, roots and fresh VEGETABLES and FRUITS, and excludes GRAIN, LEGUMES, DAIRY PRODUCTS, and refined DIETARY SUGARS.

Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.

Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the cardiovascular system or its organs or demonstration of their physiological processes.

Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.

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