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Shortened Antibiotic Treatment of 5 Days in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

2019-09-15 03:11:05 | BioPortfolio

Summary

CAP5 is an investigator-initiated multicentre non-inferiority randomized controlled trial which aims to assess the efficacy and safety of shortened antibiotic treatment duration of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in hospitalized adult patients based on clinical stability criteria.

Five days after initiation of antimicrobial therapy for CAP, participants are randomized 1:1 to parallel treatment arms: 5 days (intervention) or minimum 7 days (control) of antibiotic treatment. The intervention group discontinues antibiotics at day 5 if clinically stable and afebrile for at least 48 hours. The control group receives antibiotics for a duration of 7 days or longer at the discretion of the treating physician.

The primary outcome is 90-day readmission-free survival which will be tested with a non-inferiority margin of 6%.

Study Design

Conditions

Community-acquired Pneumonia

Intervention

Intervention, Control

Location

Aalborg University Hospital
Aalborg
Denmark
9000

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

Hvidovre University Hospital

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2019-09-15T03:11:05-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A study in which observations are made before and after an intervention, both in a group that receives the intervention and in a control group that does not.

Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.

The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)

Pneumonia caused by infection with bacteria of the family RICKETTSIACEAE.

Pneumonia due to aspiration or inhalation of various oily or fatty substances.

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