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Bayis Il Tus - A Strong Breath: Prevalence and Contributors to COPD in First Nations Communities in British Columbia

2019-10-01 07:54:59 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Background. First Nations peoples in Canada carry an increased respiratory health burden compared to non-First Nations. However, there is little accurate information of how many First Nations people have COPD, especially in remote and rural areas.

Goal & Aims of the Study. The goal of this study is to estimate the burden of COPD in remote and rural First Nations communities. This project is a partnership between the University of British Columbia (UBC), Carrier Sekani Family Services (CSFS), and 13 First Nations communities in northern BC.

Aim 1: Estimate the prevalence of COPD and the magnitude of underdiagnosis. Aim 2: Characterize the relationship between inhaled pollutants (from residential, occupational, and community/cultural sources) and: 1) symptoms; 2) airflow obstruction; and 3) health care utilization.

Methodology. We will recruit adults from randomly-selected households in 13 First Nations communities in northern BC. We will collect detailed measurements of lung function, symptoms, self-reported exposure to lung irritants, air quality, and healthcare use.

Expected Outcomes. This study will provide an accurate estimate of the prevalence of COPD and, using a culturally-relevant community-based research approach, will identify the contribution of risk factors to COPD in First Nations communities.

Description

Background. First Nations peoples in Canada carry an increased respiratory health burden compared to non-First Nations. They are often exposed to high rates of indoor air pollution and cigarette smoke; and although there is a high use of acute health care services for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), this disease is not "on the radar" in many First Nations communities. This may be because there is little accurate information of how many First Nations people have COPD, especially in remote and rural areas. Our current estimates of prevalence of COPD in First Nations are based on self-report surveys, which are known to underestimate the true number threefold. Although it is well-known that cigarette smoking causes COPD, there has been less attention paid to the contribution of residential, historical/community/cultural, and occupational factors to the burden of COPD in First Nations people.

Goal & Aims of the Study. The goal of this study is to estimate the burden of COPD in remote and rural First Nations communities. This project is a partnership between the University of British Columbia (UBC), Carrier Sekani Family Services (CSFS), and 13 First Nations communities in northern BC.

Aim 1: Estimate the prevalence of COPD and the magnitude of underdiagnosis. Aim 2: Characterize the relationship between inhaled pollutants (from residential, occupational, and community/cultural sources) and: 1) symptoms; 2) airflow obstruction; and 3) health care utilization.

Methodology. We will recruit adults from randomly-selected households in eleven First Nations communities in northern BC. We will collect detailed measurements of lung function, symptoms, self-reported exposure to lung irritants, and healthcare use. We will also collect indoor air quality measures from homes and community buildings. For Aim 1, the prevalence and underdiagnosis of COPD will be estimated by measuring lung function using post-bronchodilator spirometry and comparing the presence of airflow obstruction with the diagnosis of COPD in the electronic health record. For Aim 2, we will explore the relationship between inhaled indoor air pollutants and 1) current cough, wheeze, and dyspnea; 2) airflow obstruction; and 3) respiratory-related primary care visits or hospitalization, adjusting for age, sex, and smoking history.

Expected Outcomes. This study will provide an accurate estimate of the prevalence of COPD and, using a culturally-relevant community-based research approach, will identify the contribution of risk factors to COPD in First Nations communities.

Significance of this Project. This project is a novel partnership between UBC, CSFS and partner Nations to explore the prevalence and risk factors of COPD, using a Indigenous approach to health research. This study is unique in being able to address the risks of COPD in remote and rural First Nations communities, which will lead to further work to identify strategies to reduce these risks and improve lung health.

Study Design

Conditions

Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive

Location

13 individual First Nations in north-Central BC near Prince George, BC
Prince George
British Columbia
Canada
V2K5S3

Status

Recruiting

Source

University of British Columbia

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2019-10-01T07:54:59-0400

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