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Optimizing IV Gentamicin in JEB

2019-10-31 14:29:42 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB), an incurable and fatal inherited skin disease, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2. These mutations result in diminished laminin 332 and epidermal-dermal adherence. 85% of JEB patients have nonsense mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, suggesting that H-JEB is a prime therapeutic target for nonsense suppression therapy. The investigators recently demonstrated in three patients that topical gentamicin created new and stable laminin 332 at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), and also improved wound closure and skin quality. Furthermore, these preliminary studies showed that intravenous gentamicin also induced laminin 332 and transiently improved patients' clinical outcomes. No untoward side effects occurred. The investigators propose to optimize the intravenous gentamicin regimen including dosage and infusion schedules to enhance the therapeutic outcome. The milestones will be an increase of laminin 332 in the patients' DEJ, improvement in EB Disease Activity Scores, and no gentamicin-associated side effects.

Description

RATIONALE:

Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB), an incurable and fatal inherited skin disease, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2. These mutations result in diminished laminin 332 and epidermal-dermal adherence. 85% of JEB patients have nonsense mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, suggesting that H-JEB is a prime therapeutic target for nonsense suppression therapy. The investigators recently demonstrated in three patients that topical gentamicin created new and stable laminin 332 at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), and also improved wound closure and skin quality. Furthermore, these preliminary studies showed that intravenous gentamicin also induced laminin 332 and transiently improved patients' clinical outcomes. No untoward side effects occurred. The investigators propose to optimize the intravenous gentamicin regimen including dosage and infusion schedules to enhance the therapeutic outcome.

INTERVENTION:

There will be two study designs on JEB patients with nonsense mutation(s):

A. Short Term Daily IV Gentamicin Study: Three patients of any age with JEB caused by nonsense mutation(s) in the LAMA3 and LAMB3 genes will receive intravenous gentamicin (10 mgs/kg) daily for 24 days and then stop. Prior to treatment and at 1 month and 3 months post treatment, selected skin test sites will have skin biopsies and the specimens evaluated for the expression of laminin 332 at the dermal-epidermal junction by direct immunofluorescent staining of the skin. Safety parameters such as physical exam, review of systems, laboratory tests, audiometry, and renal function at the same time periods.

B. Long Term Biweekly IV Gentamicin Study: Three patients of any age with JEB caused by nonsense mutation(s) in the LAMA3 and LAMB3 genes will receive intravenous gentamicin (10 mgs/kg) twice weekly for 3 months (24 total infusions) and then stop. Before and after evaluations will be performed and will be the same as those in the short term intravenous study outlined above.

STUDY POPULATION:

3 adults/children for who have JEB due to nonsense mutations in the LAMA3 or LAMB3 gene for each intervention arm.

STUDY ENDPOINTS OR OUTCOMES Analysis of safety parameters, wound healing, and generation of new laminin 332 at the dermal-epidermal junction of the skin by direct immunofluorescent stain.

FOLLOW-UP Participants will be followed out to 90 days post treatment

STATISTICS Without treatment, these JEB patients have little or no laminin A3/laminin B3/laminin 332 at their dermal-epidermal junction. The expression of any newly generated laminin 332 will be measure against normal human skin (100%) by NIH Image J software.

PLANS FOR ANALYSIS Safety parameters are outlined above and will be examined at baseline and after each patient visit. Efficacy parameters outlined above will be measured at baseline and at post treatment days 30 and 90.

Study Design

Conditions

Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa

Intervention

Gentamicin Sulfate, Injectable

Location

University of Southern California
Los Angeles
California
United States
90033

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

University of Southern California

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2019-10-31T14:29:42-0400

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