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Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Cartistem® and Microfracture in Patients With Knee Articular Cartilage Injury or Defect

2014-08-27 03:16:59 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of the study is to assess and compare the safety and efficacy of the allogeneic-unrelated umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell product (Cartistem®) to that of a microfracture treatment in patients with articular cartilage defect or injury.

Description

The cartilage is a unique avascular, aneural tissue that does not regenerate easily once damaged. Chondral defects or damages to articular cartilages due to accidents, necrosis of subchondral bone tissue, or arthritis have become some of the more common disorders today. About 15% of the world's population is reportedly suffering from cartilage and joint damages such as degenerative arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. As population aging progresses and as more young people start taking up active sports, the size of the target patient group is also growing. However, despite ongoing research, an effective treatment for cartilage defects is yet to be discovered. Various different types of treatments are currently in use, such as drug therapy, arthroscopy, and artificial joint surgery. However, they all fail to address the root cause. Complete treatment, or regeneration of damaged or defective cartilage is impossible and continuous drug administration or secondary surgeries are required in many cases.

As a way of regenerating the damaged or defective cartilage tissue, treatment of localized damage to articular cartilage using autologous chondrocytes is currently under review. A few life science companies both home and abroad are marketing this method of treatment called 'autologous chondrocyte transplant'. The treatment involves the extraction of healthy cartilage tissue from the patient which is then cultured and transplanted into the damaged site.

However, this treatment requires the extraction of chondrocytes directly from the patient and thus causes trauma in healthy articular cartilage. Also, this type of treatment cannot be applied to large lesions, nor is the efficacy satisfactory in patients over the age of 40 whose cellular activation levels are low. Thus, autologous chondrocyte transplant is rather limited in the number of cells harvested and their activation level and is therefore restricted in terms of treatment site, severity of the condition, and the size of lesion. The current technology allows the application of treatments in local cartilage defects but not in degenerative arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. The technology needs to be taken up to another level in order to benefit such prevalent arthritic disorders. Treatments using stem cells do not cause damage to healthy articular cartilage as they don't require the harvesting of healthy cartilage tissues from the patients. Moreover, the number of successfully cultured cells is larger due to the excellent proliferation capability of stem cells and thus, mass supply is possible.

This clinical trial for the stem cell therapies is essential because treatment of cartilage defects with umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells, known to have the highest level of activity among all adult stem cells, opens the possibility of articular cartilage regeneration even for aged patients and patients with large lesions unable to benefit from existing treatments.

The biggest challenge faced by nations competing in the field of "tissue differentiation and regeneration using stem cells" is the question of whether or not the use of embryonic stem cells is ethical. Chondrogenesis using umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells can not only avoid similar challenges, but also present an innovative treatment mode with significant clinical implications for the patients.

In the clinical study, mesenchymal stem cells will be isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured, mixed with semi- solid polymer, and administered into the cartilage tissue lesion by orthopedic surgery in order to stimulate the regeneration of defective cartilage tissue and to improve their functions.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Cartilage Injury

Intervention

Cartistem, Microfracture treatment

Location

Gachon University Gil Hospital
Incheon
Gyunggido
Korea, Republic of
405-760

Status

Recruiting

Source

Medipost Co Ltd.

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:16:59-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Surgical techniques used to correct or augment healing of chondral defects in the joints (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). These include abrasion, drilling, and microfracture of the subchondral bone to enhance chondral resurfacing via autografts, allografts, or cell transplantation.

A type of CARTILAGE characterized by a homogenous amorphous matrix containing predominately TYPE II COLLAGEN and ground substance. Hyaline cartilage is found in ARTICULAR CARTILAGE; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; and the NASAL SEPTUM.

A type of CARTILAGE whose matrix contains ELASTIC FIBERS and elastic lamellae, in addition to the normal components of HYALINE CARTILAGE matrix. Elastic cartilage is found in the EXTERNAL EAR; EUSTACHIAN TUBE; EPIGLOTTIS; and LARYNX.

A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.

A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)

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