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Comparison of Different Doses of 131I in Severe Graves' Hyperthyroidism

2014-08-27 03:17:00 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this study is to determine whether higher doses of radioiodine increase treatment efficacy in severe Graves' disease.

Description

Graves' disease (GD) is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, affecting mainly women aged 40-60 years. Radioiodine (¹³¹I), introduced in 1941, has become a cornerstone in the treatment of GD hyperthyroidism. Because of its safety, low costs and rapid effect, it is considered a first line therapy in the United States. However, treatment failure occurs in about 15-25% of patients treated with radioiodine. Patients not cured with the first dose of radioiodine usually present severe hyperthyroidism, characterized by large goiter, high 24-hour radioiodine uptake (24h-RAIU) and very high levels of thyroid hormones. We have previously shown that large goiter (≥48ml) is an independent predictor of treatment failure. In these patients, the therapeutic failure was 40.0% while in patients with smaller goiter was only 6.5% (P=0.005; unpublished). It is generally accepted that higher doses of radioiodine improves cure rates. Indeed, a recent meta-analysis found a correlation between radioiodine dose and therapeutic success in GD patients. To our knowledge, there are no published studies evaluating cure rates with different radioiodine doses in severe GD.

Study Design

Allocation: Non-Randomized, Control: Historical Control, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Graves Disease

Intervention

Radioiodine, Radioiodine

Location

Thyroid Unit, Endocrine Division, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre
Porto Alegre
RS
Brazil
90035-003

Status

Recruiting

Source

Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:17:00-0400

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An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.

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Cell surface proteins that bind pituitary THYROTROPIN (also named thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH) and trigger intracellular changes of the target cells. TSH receptors are present in the nervous system and on target cells in the thyroid gland. Autoantibodies to TSH receptors are implicated in thyroid diseases such as GRAVES DISEASE and Hashimoto disease (THYROIDITIS, AUTOIMMUNE).

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