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Biomarkers of Lung Injury With Low Tidal Volume Ventilation Compared With Airway Pressure Release Ventilation

2014-07-23 21:11:17 | BioPortfolio

Summary

Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a spectrum of clinical syndromes of rapid respiratory system deterioration that are associated with both pulmonary and systemic illness. These syndromes are associated with 30-40% mortality with our current standard of care and are responsible for approximately 75,000 deaths in the US yearly. Current evidence-based care of ALI consists of a strategy of mechanical ventilation utilizing low lung volumes (ARDSNet ventilation) intended to limit further stretch-induced lung injury exacerbated by the ventilator. However, this strategy has been shown to be associated with increased lung injury in a subset of patients and still is associated with about a 30% mortality rate. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a different, non-experimental strategy of mechanical ventilation currently in routine clinical use. APRV is a pressure-cycled ventilator mode that allows a patient a greater degree of autonomy in controlling his or her breathing pattern than ARDSNet ventilation. Use of APRV has been associated with better oxygenation, less sedative usage, and less ventilator-associated pneumonia in small studies compared with other ventilator modes. However, debate exists over whether APRV might result in decreased or increased ventilator-associated lung injury when compared with ARDSNet ventilation. We intend to implement a randomized, cross over study looking at biomarkers of lung injury in patients with acute lung injury during ventilation with APRV and using the ARDSNet protocol. Our hypothesis is that airway pressure release ventilation is associated with lower levels of lung injury biomarkers than ARDSNet ventilation.

Description

Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represent a spectrum of clinical syndromes of rapid respiratory system deterioration that are associated with both pulmonary and systemic illness. These syndromes are associated with 30-40% mortality with our current standard of care and are responsible for approximately 75,000 deaths in the US yearly. The current evidence-based care consists of a strategy of mechanical ventilation utilizing low lung volumes (ARDSNet ventilation) intended to limit further lung injury from overstretch of the lung induced by the ventilator. However, this strategy has been shown to be associated with continued lung injury in some studies and still is associated with about a 30% mortality rate. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a different, nonexperimental strategy of mechanical ventilation currently in routine clinical use. APRV allows a patient a greater degree of autonomy in controlling his/her breathing while achieving a higher mean airway pressure (at similar plateau pressures) than that typically achieved with ARDSNet. APRV has been associated with less ventilator-associated pneumonia, better oxygenation, and less sedative usage in small studies when compared with other methods of ventilation. However, debate exists over net effects of APRV with regard to ventilator-associated lung injury. Additionally, we recently completed a study showing that APRV was associated with lower ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) rates, but this benefit did not appear to be mediated by sedation differences. We hypothesized that the VAP benefits might be mediated by greater lung recruitment and possibly less ventilator-induced lung injury with APRV. We propose a randomized, crossover study looking at biomarkers of lung injury in patients with acute lung injury ventilated with APRV and ARDSNet. Our hypothesis is that airway pressure release ventilation is associated with lower levels of lung injury biomarkers than ARDSNet ventilation.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Acute Lung Injury

Intervention

low-tidal-volume ventilation, APRV

Location

Boston Medical Center
Boston
Massachusetts
United States
02118

Status

Not yet recruiting

Source

Boston Medical Center

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-07-23T21:11:17-0400

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PubMed Articles [16909 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.

Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.

A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.

Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.

The maximum volume of air that can be inspired after reaching the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the TIDAL VOLUME and the INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is IC.

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