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Effects of Power Mobility on Young Children With Severe Motor Impairments

2014-07-23 21:11:26 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose this study is to determine the effects of power mobility on the development and function of young children of young children whose severe physical disabilities limit their exploratory behaviors and may unnecessarily restrict their cognitive, communication, and social-emotional development.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Cerebral Palsy

Intervention

Power mobility, No intervention

Location

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Lee Mitchener Tolbert Center for Develompental Disabilities
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma
United States
73117

Status

Recruiting

Source

University of Oklahoma

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-07-23T21:11:26-0400

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An electrophoretic technique for assaying the binding of one compound to another. Typically one compound is labeled to follow its mobility during electrophoresis. If the labeled compound is bound by the other compound, then the mobility of the labeled compound through the electrophoretic medium will be retarded.

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Pediatrics
Pediatrics is the general medicine of childhood. Because of the developmental processes (psychological and physical) of childhood, the involvement of parents, and the social management of conditions at home and at school, pediatrics is a specialty. With ...


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