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The 2-stage Approach for Reducing Posterior Wall Puncture During the Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization

2010-07-15 17:00:00 | BioPortfolio

Summary

To evaluate the effect of a 2-stage approach to the internal jugular vein when performing a central venous catheterization compared to the traditional one stage approach on the incidence of hematoma formation and success rate.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Prevention

Conditions

Hematoma

Intervention

Central venous catheterization, Central venous catheterization

Location

Seoul National University Hospital
Seoul
Korea, Republic of
110-744

Status

Recruiting

Source

Seoul National University Hospital

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2010-07-15T17:00:00-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Placement of an intravenous catheter in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein for central venous pressure determination, chemotherapy, hemodialysis, or hyperalimentation.

The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.

Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.

A vascular anomaly characterized by a radial or wedge-shaped arrangement of dilated VEINS draining into a larger vein in the brain, spinal cord, or the meninges. Veins in a venous angioma are surrounded by normal nervous tissue, unlike a CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM CAVERNOUS HEMANGIOMA that lacks intervening nervous tissue. Drainage of venous angioma is fully integrated with the body's venous system, therefore, in most cases there is no clinical signs and rare bleeding.

The pressure within the CARDIAC ATRIUM. It can be measured directly by using a pressure catheter (see HEART CATHETERIZATION). It can be also estimated using various imaging techniques or other pressure readings such as PULMONARY CAPILLARY WEDGE PRESSURE (an estimate of left atrial pressure) and CENTRAL VENOUS PRESSURE (an estimate of right atrial pressure).

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