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Swine Flu (Novel Influenza A H1N1) Vaccine Study

2014-08-27 03:19:12 | BioPortfolio

Summary

In the first half of this year a novel Influenza A H1N1 virus has resulted in an influenza pandemic. The United Kingdom has seen a particularly high incidence of disease. The highest rates of disease are being seen in young children. In anticipation of an influenza pandemic two vaccine manufacturers, Baxter and GlaxoSmithKline, have gained marketing authorization approval from the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) for a pandemic strain vaccine under the "mockup" dossier route based on limited clinical trial data for a candidate H5N1 vaccine. This "mockup" dossier route for pandemic influenza vaccines allows the submission of a core pandemic dossier during the interpandemic period, which results in the approval of a mockup pandemic vaccine. This is followed by a fast track approval of the pandemic vaccine based on the submission of the pandemic variation when the situation arises. The Baxter and GlaxoSmithKline vaccines have now been modified to cover the novel influenza A H1N1 strain.

Given the high rates of swine flu disease in children, this age group is likely to particularly benefit from immunization against this virus, however there are few data on the use of these vaccines in a pediatric population. The proposed study therefore aims to assess the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of these two H1N1 vaccines when administered as two doses three weeks apart to children aged 6 months to 12 years of age.

Description

The study will be an open label, randomised, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial conducted by a consortium of the leading paediatric vaccine research units in the United Kingdom. The study will recruit healthy children 6 months to 12 years of age. Children with previously laboratory confirmed infection with swine flu will be excluded, as will those that have received a treatment course of oseltamivir. Children with immune deficiencies and egg allergy will also be excluded.

The study will be conducted as a collaboration between the Health Protection Agency and the following study recruitment sites: Oxford Vaccine Group (OVG), Bristol Children's Vaccine Centre (BCVC), the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, St George's Vaccine Institute (SGVI) and the University of Southampton Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility (USWTCRF). Families in the area of these research sites will be notified of the study by methods including print and electronic media, posters and direct mail out via the child health computer departments. The study visits themselves will be conducted in locations such as hospital outpatients, GP surgeries, or schools. General practitioners will be informed of the study and all immunisations administered during the study, as will the relevant child health computer department.

Participants will be randomised on 1:1 basis to receive 2 doses of either of the H1N1 influenza vaccines being studied. These vaccines will be given 2-3 weeks apart and the blood tests will be taken at baseline and around 3 weeks after completion of the 2 dose immunisation course. If at the start of the trial there is clinical data or a recommendation from JCVI that supports the use of a half dose of either vaccine in children under 3 years of age, this will be used for this age group and the ethics committee will be informed of this change.

Participants' families will be given diary cards to record local and systemic reactions to the vaccines administered, as well as recording daily temperatures for the 7 days after receipt of the vaccines. They will be telephoned 5-7 days after each vaccination to determine if there have been any SAEs since vaccination and to remind them to mail their completed diary cards to the HPA. Participants' families will also receive a memory card on which to record any visits to a doctor or emergency department from the 8th day after vaccine administration to the next study visit and any adverse events recorded in the diary card that are ongoing after day 7.

There will be 4 groups of children in the study:

Group A1: Children aged 6 months to less than 3 years of age will receive 2 doses of the Baxter H1N1 vaccine, 2-3 weeks apart. A blood sample will be taken at baseline and around 3 weeks after the second vaccine dose.

Group B1: Children aged 6 months to less than 3 years of age will receive 2 doses of the GSK H1N1 vaccine, 2-3 weeks apart. A blood sample will be taken at baseline and around 3 weeks after the second vaccine dose.

Group A2: Children aged greater than 3 years of age to 12 years of age will receive 2 doses of the Baxter H1N1 vaccine, 2-3 weeks apart. A blood sample will be taken at baseline and around 3 weeks after the second vaccine dose.

Group B2: Children aged greater than 3 years of age to 12 years of age will receive 2 doses of the GSK H1N1 vaccine, 2-3 weeks apart. A blood sample will be taken at baseline and around 3 weeks after the second vaccine dose.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Endpoint Classification: Safety Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Prevention

Conditions

Influenza

Intervention

Baxter Novel Influenza A H1N1 Whole Virus Vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Novel Influenza A H1N1 Split Virion Vaccine

Location

Bristol Children's Vaccine Centre
Bristol
United Kingdom
BS2 8AE

Status

Completed

Source

University of Oxford

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:19:12-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.

Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.

Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.

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A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 7 and neuraminidase 9. This avian origin virus was first identified in humans in 2013.

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