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Safety and Immunogenicity of Influenza Vaccine (Surface Antigen, Inactivated) [Ph.Eur], Formulation 2009-2010, When Administered to Non-Elderly Adult and Elderly Subjects

2014-08-27 03:20:09 | BioPortfolio

Summary

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antibody response to each of the three influenza vaccine strains included in the licensed seasonal flu vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) at 21 days post immunization in non−elderly and elderly subjects in compliance with the requirements of the current European Union (EU) recommendations for the evaluation of the immunogenicity for a new formulation of a licensed flu vaccine (CPMP/BWP/214/96).

Study Design

Allocation: Non-Randomized, Control: Uncontrolled, Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Prevention

Conditions

Influenza

Intervention

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

Location

The Health Centre
Suffolk
United Kingdom
IP309QU

Status

Completed

Source

Novartis

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:20:09-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.

Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.

Infection of domestic and wild fowl and other BIRDS with INFLUENZA A VIRUS. Avian influenza usually does not sicken birds, but can be highly pathogenic and fatal in domestic POULTRY.

Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed or attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.

A genus of the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE comprising viruses similar to types A and B but less common, more stable, more homogeneous, and lacking the neuraminidase protein. They have not been associated with epidemics but may cause mild influenza. Influenza C virus is the type species.

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