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Physical Activity for Depression in People Aging With Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Spinal Cord Injury

2014-08-27 03:20:29 | BioPortfolio

Summary

People aging with disabilities such as spinal cord injury (SCI) or multiple sclerosis (MS) report high rates of major depression. Depression frequently adds to the disabilities and suffering in these populations. Few definitive studies of depression treatments have been done in people with MS and none in SCI. There are several reasons to explore novel treatments for major depression in these groups. First, standard treatments, such as antidepressant medications, may not be as effective in people with neurological disabilities. Next, people with physical disabilities tend to be inactive. Lack of physical activity has been positively correlated with higher levels of depression. Longitudinal data and treatment trials suggest that increased physical activity is related to improved mood. Controlled trials show that increased exercise and physical activity can be effective treatments for major depression in nondisabled older adults. Previous research by the investigators' group suggests that people with MS are quite interested in exercise and that exercise is a safe and effective treatment for depression in younger, less disabled people with MS. Exercise may have widespread benefits for people with MS or SCI. Finally, exercise or increased physical activity represents a low cost, non-stigmatizing, highly accessible potential treatment for depression in people with physical disabilities. In this study the investigators will determine whether a relatively brief telephone-based intervention to promote physical activity is an effective treatment for major depression in people aging with MS or SCI. The investigators define "aging" as chronological age greater than 45 years old.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Active Control, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor), Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention

Motivational interviewing, Education

Location

University of Washington
Seattle
Washington
United States
98195

Status

Recruiting

Source

University of Washington

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:20:29-0400

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

A form of multiple sclerosis characterized by a progressive deterioration in neurologic function which is in contrast to the more typical relapsing remitting form. If the clinical course is free of distinct remissions, it is referred to as primary progressive multiple sclerosis. When the progressive decline is punctuated by acute exacerbations, it is referred to as progressive relapsing multiple sclerosis. The term secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is used when relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis evolves into the chronic progressive form. (From Ann Neurol 1994;36 Suppl:S73-S79; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)

It is a client-centered, directive method for eliciting intrinsic motivation to change using open-ended questions, reflective listening, and decisional balancing. This nonjudgmental, nonconfrontational interviewing style is designed to minimize a patient's resistance to change by creating an interaction that supports open discussion of risky or problem behavior.

A non-glycosylated form of interferon beta-1 that has a serine at position 17. It is used in the treatment of both RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS and CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.

An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)

The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)

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