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Effectiveness of Atypical Antipsychotic Medication for Outpatients With Anorexia Nervosa

2014-08-27 03:30:19 | BioPortfolio

Summary

This study will compare the effectiveness of two atypical antipsychotic medications, olanzapine and aripiprazole, in treating people with anorexia nervosa.

Description

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disease of disordered eating that is characterized by self-starvation, often leading to extreme weight loss and difficulty maintaining a normal weight. Symptoms and behaviors of AN may include distorted body image, obsessive exercise, lack of menstruation among women, binge and purge eating behaviors, and intense fear of weight gain. Furthermore, people with AN are at a high risk of other mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, and medical complications, such as organ damage, heart failure, and osteoporosis. Current treatments for AN include nutrition counseling, psychotherapy, and medication. Previous studies have suggested that certain medications usually used to treat schizophrenia, also known as atypical antipsychotic drugs, may be helpful in treating people with AN. Specifically, the atypical antipsychotic medications olanzapine and aripiprazole may be effective in improving overall symptoms of AN and in restoring weight to normal levels. This study will compare the effectiveness of olanzapine and aripiprazole in treating people with AN.

Participation in this study will last 12 weeks. All participants will first undergo baseline assessments that will include questionnaires and interviews about AN symptoms, a physical exam, vital sign measurements, an electrocardiograph (EKG), and a blood draw. Participants will then be assigned randomly to 12 weeks of treatment with daily olanzapine or aripiprazole. Participants will meet with a study doctor weekly over the 12 weeks of treatment. During these visits, the study doctor will monitor participants' progress, medication dosage, vital signs, and side effects. In addition, participants will undergo repeat blood draws every 4 weeks and repeat questionnaires every month of the treatment period. Upon completing the 12 weeks of treatment, participants will repeat most baseline assessments.

Study Design

Allocation: Randomized, Control: Uncontrolled, Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study, Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment, Masking: Open Label, Primary Purpose: Treatment

Conditions

Eating Disorders

Intervention

Olanzapine, Aripiprazole

Location

New York State Psychiatric Institute
New York
New York
United States
10032

Status

Completed

Source

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Results (where available)

View Results

Links

Published on BioPortfolio: 2014-08-27T03:30:19-0400

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Mental disorders related to feeding and eating that are usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood.

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Anorexia Nervosa
The main eating disorder, anorexia nervosa, involves extreme weight loss as a result of very strict dieting. The cause is a strong belief held by the patient that they are fat (despite their extreme thinness), and become terrified of putting on weight. O...


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