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Clinical Trials About "Effect of Alphagan on Retinal Blood Flow Autoregulation and Motion Detection in Patients With Normal Pressure Glaucoma" RSS

07:51 EDT 21st August 2018 | BioPortfolio

We list hundreds of Clinical Trials about "Effect of Alphagan on Retinal Blood Flow Autoregulation and Motion Detection in Patients With Normal Pressure Glaucoma" on BioPortfolio. We draw our references from global clinical trials data listed on ClinicalTrials.gov and refresh our database daily.

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Showing "Effect Alphagan Retinal Blood Flow Autoregulation Motion Detection" Clinical Trials 1–25 of 31,000+

Extremely Relevant

Effect of Alphagan on Retinal Blood Flow Autoregulation and Motion Detection in Patients With Normal Pressure Glaucoma

The investigators have completed a study in which the investigators examined the response of the retinal circulation to changes in posture from sitting to lying down in patients with Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG). This alteration in position produces changes in the local blood pressure at the entrance to the retinal vasculature. In a healthy retina, the vasculature adapts by dilating and constricting in order to maintain a steady blood flow rate. In an eye with NTG, this oft...


Regulation of Retinal Bloodflow Pressure

Autoregulation is defined as the ability of a vascular bed to adapt its vascular resistance to changes in perfusion pressure. In the eye, several studies have reported that retinal blood flow is autoregulated over a wide range of ocular perfusion pressures. Large scale studies have shown that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is an important risk factor for the prevalence, the incidence and the progression of primary open angle glaucoma. There is also evidence that autoregulati...

Effect of Cosopt Versus Combigan on Retinal Vascular Autoregulation in Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG)

We have completed a study in which we examined the response of the retinal circulation to changes in posture from sitting to lying down in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). This alteration in position produces changes in the local blood pressure at the entrance to the retinal vasculature. In a healthy retina, the vasculature adapts by dilating and constricting in order to maintain a steady blood flow rate. In an eye with POAG, this often does not occur. As a...


Role of Adenosine in the Control of Choroidal Blood Flow During Changes in Ocular Perfusion Pressure.

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. For a long time it had been assumed that the choroid is a strictly passive vascular bed, which shows no autoregulation. However, recently several groups have identified some autoregulatory capacity of the human choroid. In the brain and the retina the mechanism behind autoregulation is most likely linked to changes in transmural pressure. In this model arterioles change...

Regulation of Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow During Combined Changes in Intraocular Pressure and Arterial Blood Pressure

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. The existence of an effective autoregulation in the optic nerve head (ONH) circulation has been shown in animals and humans. Moderate elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) caused only slight effect on ONH blood flow in monkeys, cats and rabbits. In humans, during an artificial IOP rise using a suction cup method the ONH blood flow maintains almost constant until IOP r...

Role of Nitric Oxide in Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Regulation During Isometric Exercise in Healthy Humans

Autoregulation is defined as the ability of a vascular bed to adapt its vascular resistance to changes in perfusion pressure. In the eye, several studies have reported that retinal blood flow is autoregulated over a wide range of ocular perfusion pressures. The investigators recently showed that nitric oxide (NO) is a key metabolite in the regulation of vascular tone in the eye and plays an important role in the blood flow autoregulation of the choroidal circulation. However, n...

Continous Assessment of Cerebral Autoregulation With Near-infrared Spectroscopy

Cerebral autoregulation can be explained by a tight coupling between oxygen supply and demand of the brain, and is essential to maintain a constant cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the context of changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. In this study, we use Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to monitor cerebral autoregulation.

Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow, Retinal Oxygenation and Retinal Oxygen Extraction in Healthy Subjects During Normoxia and Systemic Hyperoxia

The inner retina is crucially dependent on an adequate retinal blood supply. When the retina becomes ischemic and hypoxic this results in severe vision loss due to retinal neovascularization. Measurement of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygenation is, however, still a difficult task. Information on retinal oxygenation is almost unavailable from human studies. In the present protocol the investigators propose a procedure allowing for the measurement of retinal blood flow, ret...

Regulation of Choroidal Blood Flow During Combined Changes in Intraocular Pressure and Arterial Blood Pressure

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. For a long time it had been assumed that the choroid is a strictly passive vascular bed, which shows no autoregulation. However, recently several groups have identified some autoregulatory capacity of the choroid. Choroidal autoregulation was first shown in a rabbit model where intraocular pressure (IOP) and arterial blood pressure could be varied independently. In thes...

Regulation of Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow During Combined Changes in Intraocular Pressure and Arterial Blood Pressure

Autoregulation is defined as the ability of a vascular bed to adapt its vascular resistance to changes in perfusion pressure. In the eye, several studies have reported that retinal blood flow is autoregulated over a wide range of ocular perfusion pressures. In the optic nerve head only few data are available. Large scale studies have shown that reduced ocular perfusion pressure is an important risk factor for the prevalence, the incidence and the progression of primary open ang...

Effects of Common Topical Glaucoma Therapy on Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Autoregulation During Increased Arterial Blood Pressure and Artificially Elevated Intraocular Pressure in Healthy Humans

Background Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. The existence of an effective autoregulation in the optic nerve circulation has been shown in animals and humans. The exact mechanism behind this autoregulation is still unknown. The motive for the investigation of optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow autoregulation is to enhance the understanding of pathologic eye conditions associated with ocular vascul...

Ocular Blood Flow in Early Glaucoma Patients Before and After Treatment With Dorzolamide

Impaired ocular blood flow is an important risk factor in the pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). A few studies suggest that topical dorzolamide 2% may increase optic nerve perfusion. The objectives of this study are to learn the effects of dorzolamide on the retinal and optic nerve blood flow of glaucoma patients. The present study is a prospective, randomized, double-masked, crossover design study of newly diagnosed or already treated patients with early glau...

Choroidal Blood Flow Regulation During Isometric Exercise: Effects of Ca2+-Channel Blockade

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. For a long time it had been assumed that the choroid is a strictly passive vascular bed, which shows no autoregulation. However, recently several groups have identified some autoregulatory capacity of the human choroid. In the brain and the retina the mechanism behind autoregulation is most likely linked to changes in transmural pressure. In this model arterioles change...

Additivity Study: Additive Effect on Eye Pressure of Azopt and Alphagan P to Travatan

The purpose of this study is to compare the additive effect on eye pressure of Azopt and Alphagan P to Travatan.

Effects of Indomethacin on Retinal and Choroidal Blood Flow in Healthy Volunteers

Prostaglandins (PG) are known to alter regional ocular blood flow and exhibit vasoactive properties in isolated ocular blood vessels. A variety of animal experiments indicate that endogenous PGs play a role in the regulation of retinal (RBF) and choroidal (ChBF) blood flow. There is also evidence that the prostaglandin pathway is involved in the activation of NO production in humans, however, the mechanisms for interactions between PG and NO in ocular vasculature are still uncl...

Role of Nitrogen Oxide (NO) in the Control of Choroidal Blood Flow During a Decrease in Ocular Perfusion Pressure

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. For a long time it had been assumed that the choroid is a strictly passive vascular bed, which shows no autoregulation. However, recently several groups have identified some autoregulatory capacity of the human choroid. In the brain and the retina the mechanism behind autoregulation is most likely linked to changes in transmural pressure. In this model arterioles chang...

Neurovascular Coupling in Patients With Early Stage Diabetes Retinopathy

A variety of studies demonstrate that ocular blood flow is altered in diabetes and retinal perfusion abnormalities have been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Various animal and human studies have demonstrated that retinal and optic nerve blood flow increase in response to diffuse luminance flicker. Based on studies with ERG, this effect has been attributed to augmented activity in the retinal ganglion cells and associated axons indicati...

Measurement of Total Retinal Blood Flow and Oxygen Extraction in Patients With Diabetes and Healthy Subjects

The prevalence of diabetes and diabetes-associated complications is still increasing. Several major long-term complications of diabetes such as cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, diabetic retinopathy and others relate to the damage of blood vessels. Given that the eye provides the unique possibility in the human body to directly visualize blood vessels, much interest has been directed towards studying the ocular circulation and retinal oxygen metabolism. Alth...

The Relationship Between Stage of Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Blood Flow in Patients With IDDM During Euglycemic Clamp

Impaired retinal blood flow has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Patel et al. (1992) showed that retinal blood flow increases with the level of diabetic retinopathy. Grunwald et al. (1996) reported that patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) of relatively short duration have increased retinal blood flow, even before the onset of diabetic retinopathy. On the other hand the data of Bursell et al. (1996) indicate that IDDM patients hav...

The Effect of an α2-Adrenoceptor Antagonist (Yohimbine) on Dynamic Autoregulation in the Human Middle Cerebral Artery and Ophthalmic Artery

Blood flow autoregulation is defined as the ability of a tissue to maintain a relatively constant flow, despite moderate alterations in perfusion pressure. Similar to the cerebral, renal, coronary and skeletal muscle circulations, the ocular vascular bed shows the property of flow autoregulation. This homeostatic mechanism allows blood supply to the eye to match metabolic demand during daily activities, such as changes in posture, or in more critical conditions. Autoregu...

Feasibility of Improving Cerebral Autoregulation in Acute Intracerebral Haemorrhage

In the UK, 23,000 (15%) of the 150,000 people who suffer a stroke each year have bleeding in the brain, also referred to as acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). An Autoregulation Index (ARI) can be assigned between 0 and 9 (0 being poor and 9 being the most efficient CA observed) to gauge how good the control over blood flow is at a given time. Dynamic CA (dCA) is a measure of the response of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to rapid changes in blood pressure (BP), and several key s...

Measurement of Total Retinal Blood Flow During Flicker Stimulation in Healthy Subjects

Neurovascular coupling or functional hyperemia is defined as an essential physiologic mechanism in the brain, which is necessary for the local adaption of blood flow to altered metabolic demands of the tissue. It has been shown that also in the eye, blood flow is considerably coupled to retinal neural activity. The current concept of functional hyperemia is that visual stimulation, as flicker light, effectuates increasing neural activity in the retina, which elevates the metabo...

Relevant

Role of Endothelin- and Nitric Oxide-System in the Regulation of Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow During Changes in Ocular Perfusion Pressure

Autoregulation is the ability of a vascular bed to maintain blood flow despite changes in perfusion pressure. The existence of an effective autoregulation in the optic nerve circulation has been shown in animals and humans. The exact mechanism behind this autoregulation is still unknown. The motive for the investigation of optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow autoregulation is to enhance the understanding of pathologic eye conditions associated with ocular vascular disorders. To c...

The Validity of Retinal Blood Flow Measurements During Hyperoxia in Humans Using Fourier Domain Color Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography (CDOCT)

Noninvasive monitoring of blood flow in retinal circulation may elucidate the progression and treatment of ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), a noninvasive optical method combined with vessel size determination has been used extensively as a valuable research tool to examine blood flow dynamics in the human retina. However, no information on the velocity profile within the vess...

Influence of Prostaglandins on Ocular Blood Flow in Glaucoma Patients

Vasoactivity of topical drugs may be of prognostic relevance in glaucoma. There is very little information for a major class, the prostaglandin analogues with regard to this aspect. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of travoprost 0.004% and latanoprost 0.005% on choroidal blood flow and retinal vascular diameter in glaucoma patients. After washout of current topical medication, intraocular pressure (IOP) in both eyes (Goldmann applanation tonometry), choroidal ...


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