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Clinical Trials About "Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer" RSS

23:16 EDT 19th September 2019 | BioPortfolio

We list hundreds of Clinical Trials about "Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer" on BioPortfolio. We draw our references from global clinical trials data listed on ClinicalTrials.gov and refresh our database daily.

More Information about "Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer" on BioPortfolio

We have published hundreds of Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer news stories on BioPortfolio along with dozens of Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer Clinical Trials and PubMed Articles about Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer for you to read. In addition to the medical data, news and clinical trials, BioPortfolio also has a large collection of Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer Companies in our database. You can also find out about relevant Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer Drugs and Medications on this site too.

Showing "Gene Therapy Help Fight Tough Treat Blood Cancer" Clinical Trials 1–25 of 54,000+

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Tough Talks: A Disclosure Intervention for HIV+ Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (YMSM)

Tough Talks is a virtual reality based HIV disclosure intervention that allows HIV+ individuals to practice disclosing to romantic partners. Tough Talks allows participants to have the opportunity to practice disclosing using a variety of strategies and experience different outcomes including acceptance, confusion, lack of HIV knowledge, and rejection.


Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Cancer of The Liver

RATIONALE: Inserting the p53 gene into a person's tumor may improve the body's ability to fight liver cancer. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy with the p53 gene in treating patients who have cancer of the liver that cannot be surgically removed.

Gene Therapy Plus Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the p53 gene into a person's cancer cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. Combining chemotherapy with gene therapy may kill more tumor cells. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy plus chemotherapy in treating patients who have breast cancer.


Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Bladder Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the p53 gene into a person's bladder cancer cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy in treating patients with advanced bladder cancer.

Gene Therapy in HIV-Positive Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

The purpose of this study is to see if it is safe and effective to use gene therapy to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-positive patients. Stem cell transplantation is a procedure used to treat NHL. Stem cells are very immature cells that develop to create all of the different types of blood cells. In this study, some of your stem cells will be treated with gene therapy, meaning the cells are treated with a virus that does not cause disease. Some cells will receive a ...

Gene Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for p53 into a person's cancer cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to damage tumor cells. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy plus radiation therapy in treating patients who have non-small cell lung cancer.

Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the p53 gene into a person's cancer cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy using the p53 gene in treating patients with advanced recurrent or persistent ovarian cancer or primary peritoneal cavity cancer.

Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for p53 into a person's tumor may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy in treating patients who have recurrent head and neck cancer.

Relevant

Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for adenovirus p53 into a person's tumor may improve the body's ability to fight cancer. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy in treating patients who have recurrent malignant gliomas.

Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Surgically Removed

RATIONALE: Exposing tumor cells to the p53 gene may improve the body's ability to fight non-small cell lung cancer. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of gene therapy in treating patients who have non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be surgically removed.

Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Primary Brain Tumors

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for herpes virus into a person's cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy using antiviral drugs such as ganciclovir. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectivenesss of gene therapy in treating patients with primary brain tumors.

Combination Chemotherapy Plus Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With CNS Tumors

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Combining more than one drug may kill more tumor cells. Inserting a specific gene into a person's peripheral stem cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of combination chemotherapy plus gene therapy in treating patients who have CNS tumors.

Gene Therapy and Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

RATIONALE: Interleukin-2 may stimulate a person's white blood cells to kill ovarian cancer cells. Interleukin-2 combined with white blood cells that are gene-modified to recognize and kill ovarian cancer cells may be an effective treatment for recurrent or residual ovarian cancer. PURPOSE: Phase I trial to study the effectiveness of interleukin-2 plus gene-modified white blood cells in treating patients who have advanced ovarian epithelial cancer.

Gene Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

RATIONALE: Gene therapy may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of gene therapy together with chemotherapy in treating patients with advanced solid tumors or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Gene Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for RevM10 into a person's peripheral stem cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer or make the cancer more sensitive to chemotherapy. PURPOSE: Phase I/II trial to study the effectiveness of RevM10-treated stem cells plus chemotherapy and peripheral stem cell transplantation in treating patients who have HIV-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

How Our Immune System Can Help Fight Cancer

There is growing evidence that our immune system can help fight cancer. This has stimulated interest in the development and application of tumor vaccines for several human solid tumors, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). A major obstacle to the development of these vaccines is that there are specialty cells called regulatory T cells that prevent the immune system from attacking all of our organs. These regulatory T cells also prevent our immune system for attacking can...

Study of People With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cancer Administering Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Which the Gene Encoding CISH Was Inactivated Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

Background: The gene CISH can weaken immune cells called lymphocytes. It is found in all cells of the body but it most negatively impacts lymphocytes. This study may help people with certain cancers.Lymphocyte cells will be taken from their tumors, the CISH gene will be removed from those cells, then the cells will be returned to the person. Researchers hope this process will help the cells work better and fight the tumors. Objective: To see if cells with the CIS...

Satraplatin and Prednisone to Treat Prostate Cancer

Background: Satraplatin is an experimental drug that may be of benefit to patients with prostate cancer. Prednisone is approved for treating prostate cancer. The gene ERCC1 helps repair cell damage caused by satraplatin. It is possible that patients who have a variant of this gene will not benefit from treatment with satraplatin because the drug will not be able to damage the cancer cells effectively. Objectives: To determine if satraplatin may help treat prost...

Safety and Efficacy of EGEN-001 Combined With Carboplatin and Docetaxel in Recurrent, Platinum-Sensitive, Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer may be caused by a build-up of genetic defects, or damaged genes within the body's cells. When genes are damaged, the body may be unable to produce a group of proteins, called cytokines, used by the immune system to fight cancer and some infections. The investigational gene transfer agent EGEN-001 contains the human gene for the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) in a special carrier system designed to enter the cells and help the body to produce cytokines. Therefor...

Gene-Modified Immune Cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Merkel Cell Cancer

This phase I/II trial studies the side effects of gene-modified immune cells (FH-MCVA2TCR) and to see how well they work in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into immune cells may improve the body's ability to fight Merkel cell cancer.

Setting up a Blood Bank for Gene Therapy in HIV-Infected Infants

The purpose of this study is to set up a blood bank for infants who have HIV-positive mothers. This blood may be used in the future to treat the child if he/she turns out to be HIV-positive. Blood from the umbilical cord contains a certain kind of cell called a stem cell. Stem cells eventually turn into one of the many types of blood cells. If HIV infection can be prevented in these stem cells, then, when these stem cells are injected back into the infant, the new cells ...

Safety Study of phIL-12-005/PPC to Treat Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer may be caused by a build-up of genetic defects, or damaged genes within the cells of the body. Because the genes are damaged, the body is unable to produce a group of proteins called cytokines which are used by the immune system to fight cancer and some infections. The investigational gene transfer agent EGEN-001 (phIL-12-005/PPC) contains the human gene for interleukin-12 [IL-12] (a cytokine) in a special carrier system designed to enter the cells and help the ...

C7R-GD2.CART Cells for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma (GAIL-N)

This study is for patients with neuroblastoma that has either come back after treatment or did not respond to standard or other investigational treatments. Because there is no standard treatment for this cancer at this time, patients are being asked to volunteer in a gene transfer research study using special immune cells called T cells. T cells are a type of white blood cell that helps the body fight infection. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No...

Leuvectin Followed By Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Prostate Cancer

RATIONALE: Inserting the gene for interleukin-2 into a person's cancer cells may improve the body's ability to fight cancer. Using leuvectin to deliver this gene may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer. PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of leuvectin followed by surgery in treating patients who have stage II or stage III prostate cancer.

Gene Mutations in Patients With Advanced Prostate Cancer That Is Not Responsive to Hormone Therapy

RATIONALE: Gene mutations may make prostate cancer cells unable to attach to androgens. This may permit the growth of prostate cancer. Gene testing may improve the identification of patients with advanced prostate cancer. PURPOSE: Clinical trial to study the androgen receptor gene in patients with prostate cancer that is not responsive to hormone therapy.


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