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Clinical Trials About "Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Versus Treatment Inactive Control" RSS

14:09 EST 9th December 2019 | BioPortfolio

We list hundreds of Clinical Trials about "Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Versus Treatment Inactive Control" on BioPortfolio. We draw our references from global clinical trials data listed on ClinicalTrials.gov and refresh our database daily.

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Showing "Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Versus Treatment Inactive Control" Clinical Trials 1–25 of 52,000+

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Pelvic Floor Muscle Training and Kaatsu Training for Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence

This study examines the effect of adding so called Kaatsu training to pelvic floor muscle training. Half the participants will perform Kaatsu training on their thigh muscles followed by pelvic floor muscle training. The other half will receive pelvic floor muscle training alone.


Pelvic Floor Muscle Training for Incontinence in Older Women.

To determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women aged 70 years and over, who have proven stress urinary incontinence. The hypotheses to be tested are: 1. That pelvic floor muscle training is effective in relief of symptoms of stress urinary incontinence as measured by a greater reduction in the number of episodes of incontinence, quantity of urine lost and improvement of quality of life. 2. That women who undertake pelvic floor muscle training wi...

Early Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Improves Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength in Patient After Low Anterior Resection

The aim of study is to investigate the difference in Maximum Squeeze Pressure in patients with and without pelvic floor muscle training in low anterior resection in peri-operative period


The Effect of Physiotherapy Treatment Following Gynaecological Surgery

Optimal pelvic floor muscle function is known to assist bladder and bowel function and control, pelvic organ support, as well as other areas of health. It is also known that problems in some of tehse areas can be a consequence of pelvic surgery. By addressing the requirements for good bladder and bowel function/control, and organ support in the early post-surgery phase when tissue repair and scar formation are critical, it is proposed that there will be a rduction in the longte...

Outpatient and Home Pelvic Floor Training for Stress Urinary Incontinence

The objective of this study is to compare the effect of outpatient pelvic floor muscle training versus home pelvic floor muscle training in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. The hypothesis of this study is that home pelvic floor muscle training is as effective as outpatient pelvic floor muscle training for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

Effectiveness of Pelvic Floor Muscle and Abdominal Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle and abdominal training in reproductive-age patients with stress urinary incontinence. This prospective randomized controlled design study included 64 female patients aged 18-49 years with stress urinary incontinence. The patients were divided into 2 groups (32 PFMT "Pelvic Floor Muscle Training" and 32 PFMT+AT "Abdominal Training") by computer-based randomization. The stress urinary incontinence ...

Effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Stroke

Aim: To evaluate the long term effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life paramters.

Levator Ani Muscle Avulsion at First Birth of Mexican Women: Randomized Control Trial

Levator Ani Muscle (LAM) avulsion occurs in 13-36% of women having their first birth. These damages by palpation and ultrasound of the pelvic floor can be detected. Avulsion of the LAM results in decreased muscle strength of the pelvic floor, enlarge the genital hiatus and promotes pelvic organ prolapse. The perineal muscle training is a proposal to combine the perineal massage with pelvic floor exercises in order to prepare the LAM in the last weeks before delivery, to withsta...

Pelvic Floor Muscle Assessment at 3-and 4-dimensional Transperineal Ultrasound

Injuries to the pelvic floor muscles and fascias during delivery and childbirth may lead to urinary incontinence (25-45 %), faecal incontinence (11-45%), pelvic organ prolapse (7-23%), sexual dysfunction (15-33 %) and chronic pain syndromes (4-15%). Pelvic floor muscle injuries are not easy to diagnose as they are not visible when looking at surface anatomy during a standard gynaecological examination. The investigators are therefore in urgent need of better tools to diagnose t...

Does Doing Pelvic Floor Exercise Ease Symptoms for Women Living With Prolapse?

The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of undertaking a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of a pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) intervention for women with pelvic organ prolapse.

The Pelvic Floor Muscle Function in Chinese Primipara, a One-year Cohort Study

It is a prospective cohort study.The primiparas in six geographic regions of China are recruited to observe the natural recovery of pelvic floor muscle. The pelvic floor muscle function is evaluated at 6 weeks,3 months and 12 months after delivery.

Efficacy of Biofeedback in Women With Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

Recent studies have found that pelvic floor muscle training can relieve pelvic organ prolapse related symptoms. However, the rate of cure or improvement of symptoms with exercise prescription, different compliance of the patient's behavior have great differences. Biofeedback is an instrument used to record the biological signals ( electrical activity) during a voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction and provide feedback in auditory or visual form (a louder sound with a strong...

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training(PFMT) on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in Men With Stroke

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in men after stroke. 120 men with LUTS or increased LUTS after stroke is included and randomized into a treatment group or a control group. The subjects in the treatment group follows a 12 week standard PFMT program, while the control group is not given specific treatment of their LUTS but like the treatment group follows the standard rehabilitation pro...

The Effects of Pilates in Muscle Strength of the Pelvic Floor as Treatment of Post Prostatectomy Urinary Incontinence

The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy between a Pilates exercise program and a Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) protocol combined with anal electrical stimulation (AES) in muscular pressure strength of the pelvic floor as conservative treatment of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy.

Physical Exercise for Colorectal Cancer Patients After Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision

Fecal incontinence is common in patients with rectal cancer after surgery. Previous studies showed that pelvic floor muscle and external sphincter muscle training after stoma closure could improve the severity of incontinence and other fecal symptoms, but there is no study about the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise intervention before stoma closure. We are wondering would the symptom of fecal incontinence recover sooner and better if we give the pelvic floor muscle exerc...

Prenatal Pelvic Floor Prevention (3PN)

Objective: Compare pelvic floor disorders (urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, genital prolapse, perineal pain, sexual troubles) 12 month after a first delivery between a group of women with prenatal pelvic floor exercises and a control group. Hypothesis: Prenatal pelvic floor exercises reduce postpartum urinary incontinence.

Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Women With Spinal Cord Injury

The purpose of this study is to determine whether pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and intravaginal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) are effective in reducing urinary incontinence and improving quality of life in women with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training of Pregnant Women in Nepal: Feasibility, Compliance and Outcome

To our knowledge, no studies in Nepal have reported the feasibility of performing the Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in Nepalese women. The aim of the study is to develop and implement a Pelvic Floor Muscle(PFM) physiotherapy program based on information, education and exercise in order to prevent or reduce Pelvic organ prolapse(POP) and Urinary Incontinence (UI) in pregnant Nepalese women The women will receive information (leaflet, video, posters) and instruction/guidan...

Effects of Neuromuscular Pelvic Realigning Exercises on Pelvic Floor Muscle Function in Continent SubjectS

The goal of this research study is to investigate the effect of a new neuromuscular approach for correcting pelvic alignment and improving pelvic floor muscle function. Investigators hypothesized that this approach would be significantly superior than no intervention to improve the ability of pelvic floor muscle contraction, measured by transabdominal sonography as bladder base elevation. Participants will be randomized to the intervention and control groups. while intervention...

Intravaginal Vibratory Stimulus and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

This is a randomized blinded trial with non-probabilistic sampling for convenience. Our goal is to compare PFMT with intravaginal vibratory stimulus versus PFMT alone on the treatment of female urinary incontinence.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training to Treat Urinary Incontinence After Radical Prostatectomy

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in the treatment of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy.

Stress Urinary Incontinence in Elite Athletes

A protocol of pelvic floor muscles training (PFMT) in elite athletes was applied. They will do it for 4 months. Then re-evaluated.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction Among Physiotherapy Students Before and After "Women Health" Course

The study aim is to evaluate the ability to correctly contract pelvic floor muscle among physiotherapy students before and after "women health" course. Pelvic floor muscle contraction will be evaluated via transabdominal ultrasound.

Evaluation of Duloxetine and Innovative Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence

This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of duloxetine and pelvic floor muscle training in women who suffer from stress urinary incontinence

What is the Best Verbal Instruction for Contraction the Pelvic Floor Muscles?

The aim of this study is to T to compare the effectiveness of producing a pelvic floor muscle contraction by different verbal instruction. Pelvic floor muscle contraction will be measured displacement of the pelvic floor when imaged on ultrasound.


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