Fluorouracil 5% TOPICAL CREAM | Fluorouracil

16:39 EST 28th November 2014 | BioPortfolio
Note: While we endeavour to keep our records up-to-date one should not rely on these details being accurate without first consulting a professional. Click here to read our full medical disclaimer.

FOR TOPICAL USE ONLY -NOT FOR OPHTHALMIC, ORAL,OR INTRAVAGINAL USE.

Fluorouracil Cream is a topical preparation containing the fluorinated pyrimidine 5-fluorouracil, an antineoplastic antimetabolite.

Fluorouracil Cream contains 5% fluorouracil in a vanishing cream base consisting of white petrolatum, stearyl alcohol, propylene glycol, polysorbate 60 and parabens (methyl and propyl).

Chemically, fluorouracil is 5-fluoro-2,4(1H,3H-pyrimidinedione. It is a white to practically white, crystalline powder which is sparingly soluble in water and slightly soluble in alcohol. One gram of fluorouracil is soluble in 100 mL of propylene glycol. The molecular weight of 5-fluorouracil is 130.08 and the structural formula is:

IMAGE fluorouracil-01.jpg

There is evidence that the metabolism of fluorouracil in the anabolic pathway blocks the methylation reaction of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid. In this manner fluorouracil interferes with the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and to a lesser extent inhibits the formation of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Since DNA and RNA are essential for cell division and growth, the effect of fluorouracil may be to create a thymine deficiency which provokes unbalanced growth and death of the cell. The effects of DNA and RNA deprivation are most marked on those cells which grow more rapidly and take up fluorouracil at a more rapid rate. The catabolic metabolism of fluorouracil results in degradation products (eg, COz, urea, a-fluoro-(3-alanine) which are inactive.

Systemic absorption studies of topically applied fluorouracil have been performed on patients with actinic keratoses using tracer amounts of C-labeled fluorouracil added to a 5% preparation. All patients had been receiving nonlabeled fluorouracil until the peak of the inflammatory reaction occurred (2 to 3 weeks), ensuring that the time of maximum absorption was used for measurement. One gram of labeled preparation was applied to the entire face and neck and left in place for 12 hours. Urine samples were collected. At the end of 3 days, the total recovery ranged between 0.48% and 0.94% with an average of 0.76%, indicating that approximately 5.98% of the topical dose was absorbed systemically. If applied twice daily, this would indicate systemic absorption of topical fluorouracil to be in the range of 5 to 6 mg per daily dose of 100 mg. In an additional study, negligible amounts of labeled material were found in plasma, urine and expired CO after 3 days of treatment with topically applied C-labeled fluorouracil.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is recommended for the topical treatment of multiple actinic or solar keratoses. In the 5% strength it is also useful in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinomas when conventional methods are impractical, such as with multiple lesions or difficult treatment sites. Safety and efficacy in other indications have not been established.

The diagnosis should be established prior to treatment, since this method has not been proven effective in other types of basal cell carcinomas. With isolated, easily accessible basal cell carcinomas, surgery is preferred since success with such lesions is almost 100%. The success rate with Fluorouracil Cream is approximately 93%, based on 113 lesions in 54 patients. 88 lesions treated with the cream produced 7 failures.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women with either the topical or the parenteral forms of fluorouracil. One birth defect (cleft lip and palate) has been reported in the newborn of a patient using Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream as recommended. One birth defect (ventricular septal defect) and cases of miscarriage have been reported when Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream was applied to mucous membrane areas. Multiple birth defects have been reported in a fetus of a patient treated with intravenous fluorouracil.

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream. Fluorouracil administered parenterally has been shown to be teratogenic in mice, rats, and hamsters when given at doses equivalent to the usual human intravenous dose; however, the amount of fluorouracil absorbed systemically after topical administration to actinic keratoses is minimal (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY). Fluorouracil exhibited maximum teratogenicity when given to mice as single intraperitoneal injections of 10 to 40 mg/kg on Day 10 or 12 of gestation. Similarly, intraperitoneal doses of 12 to 37 mg/kg given to rats between Days 9 and 12 of gestation and intramuscular doses of 3 to 9 mg/kg given to hamsters between Days 8 and 11 of gestation were teratogenic and/or embryotoxic (ie, resulted in increased resorptions or embryolethality). In monkeys, divided doses of 40 mg/kg given between Days 20 and 24 of gestation were not teratogenic. Doses higher than 40 mg/kg resulted in abortion.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream should not be used in patients with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme deficiency. A large percentage of fluorouracil is catabolized by the DPD enzyme. DPD enzyme deficiency can result in shunting of fluorouracil to the anabolic pathway, leading to cytotoxic activity and potential toxicities.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant during therapy. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while using this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is also contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any of its components.

Application to mucous membranes should be avoided due to the possibility of local inflammation and ulceration. Additionally, cases of miscarriage and a birth defect (ventricular septal defect) have been reported when Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream was applied to mucous membrane areas during pregnancy.

Occlusion of the skin with resultant hydration has been shown to increase percutaneous penetration of several topical preparations. If any occlusive dressing is used in treatment of basal cell carcinoma, there may be an increase in the severity of inflammatory reactions in the adjacent normal skin. A porous gauze dressing may be applied for cosmetic reasons without increase in reaction.

Exposure to ultraviolet rays should be minimized during and immediately following treatment with Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream because the intensity of the reaction may be increased.

Patients should discontinue therapy with Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream if symptoms of DPD enzyme deficiency develop (see CONTRAINDICATIONS section).

Rarely, life-threatening toxicities such as stomatitis, diarrhea, neutropenia, and neurotoxicity have been reported with intravenous administration of fluorouracil in patients with DPD enzyme deficiency. One case of lifethreatening systemic toxicity has been reported with the topical use of Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream in a patient with DPD enzyme deficiency. Symptoms included severe abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and chills. Physical examination revealed stomatitis, erythematous skin rash, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, inflammation of the esophagus, stomach, and small bowel. Although this case was observed with 5% fluorouracil cream, it is unknown whether patients with profound DPD enzyme deficiency would develop systemic toxicity with lower concentrations of topically applied fluorouracil.

There is a possibility of increased absorption through ulcerated or inflamed skin.

Patients should be forewarned that the reaction in the treated areas may be unsightly during therapy and, usually, for several weeks following cessation of therapy. Patients should be instructed to avoid exposure to ultraviolet rays during and immediately following treatment with Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream because the intensity of the reaction may be increased. If Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is applied with the fingers, the hands should be washed immediately afterward. Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream should not be applied on the eyelids or directly into the eyes, nose or mouth because irritation may occur.

Solar keratoses which do not respond should be biopsied to confirm the diagnosis. Follow-up biopsies should be performed as indicated in the management of superficial basal cell carcinoma.

Adequate long-term studies in animals to evaluate carcinogenic potential have not been conducted with fluorouracil. Studies with the active ingredient of Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream, 5-fluorouracil, have shown positive effects in in vitro tests for mutagenicity and on impairment of fertility.

5-Fluorouracil was positive in three in vitro cell neoplastic transformation assays. In the C3H/10T½ clone 8 mouse embryo cell system, the resulting morphologically transformed cells formed tumors when inoculated into immunosuppressed syngeneic mice.

While no evidence for mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames test (3 studies), fluorouracil has been shown to be mutagenic in the survival count rec-assay with Bacillus subtilis and in the Drosophila wing-hair spot test. Fluorouracil produced petite mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was positive in the micronucleus test (bone marrow cells of male mice).

Fluorouracil was clastogenic in vitro (ie, chromatid gaps, breaks and exchanges) in Chinese hamster fibroblasts at concentrations of 1.0 and 2.0 µg/mL and has been shown to increase sister chromatid exchange in vitro in human lymphocytes. In addition, 5-fluorouracil has been reported to produce an increase in numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of patients treated with this product.

Doses of 125 to 250 mg/kg, administered intraperitoneally, have been shown to induce chromosomal aberrations and changes in chromosome organization of spermatogonia in rats. Spermatogonial differentiation was also inhibited by fluorouracil, resulting in transient infertility. However, in studies with a strain of mouse which is sensitive to the induction of sperm head abnormalities after exposure to a range of chemical mutagens and carcinogens, fluorouracil was inactive at oral doses of 5 to 80 mg/kg/day. In female rats, fluorouracil administered intraperitoneally at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg during the preovulatory phase of oogenesis significantly reduced the incidence of fertile matings, delayed the development of preimplantation and postimplantation embryos, increased the incidence of preimplantation lethality and induced chromosomal anomalies in these embryos. Single dose intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of 5-fluorouracil have been reported to kill differentiated spermatogonia and spermatocytes (at 500 mg/kg) and to produce abnormalities in spermatids (at 50 mg/kg) in mice.

See CONTRAINDICATIONS section.

It is not known whether Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is excreted in human milk. Because there is some systemic absorption of fluorouracil after topical administration (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY), because many drugs are excreted in human milk, and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue use of the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Safety and effectiveness in children have not been established.

The most frequent adverse reactions to Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream occur locally and are often related to an extension of the pharmacological activity of the drug. These include burning, crusting, allergic contact dermatitis, erosions, erythema, hyperpigmentation, irritation, pain, photosensitivity, pruritus, scarring, rash, soreness and ulceration. Ulcerations, other local reactions, cases of miscarriage and a birth defect (ventricular septal defect) have been reported when Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream was applied to mucous membrane areas. Leukocytosis is the most frequent hematological side effect.

Although a causal relationship is remote, other adverse reactions which have been reported infrequently are:

Central Nervous System: Emotional upset, insomnia, irritability.

Gastrointestinal: Medicinal taste, stomatitis.

Hematological: Eosinophilia, thrombocytopenia, toxic granulation.

Integumentary: Alopecia, blistering, bullous pemphigoid, discomfort, ichthyosis, scaling, suppuration, swelling, telangiectasia, tenderness, urticaria, skin rash.

Special Senses: Conjunctival reaction, corneal reaction, lacrimation, nasal irritation.

Miscellaneous: Herpes simplex.

There have been no reports of overdosage with Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream.

The oral LD for the 5% topical cream was 234 mg/kg in rats and 39 mg/kg in dogs. These doses represented 11.7 and 1.95 mg/kg of fluorouracil, respectively. Studies with a 5 % topical solution yielded an oral LD of 214 mg/kg in rats and 28.5 mg/kg in dogs, corresponding to 10.7 and 1.43 mg/kg of fluorouracil, respectively. The topical application of the 5 % cream to rats yielded an LD of greater than 500 mg/kg.

When Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is applied to a lesion, a response occurs with the following sequence: erythema, usually followed by vesiculation, desquamation, erosion and reepithelialization.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream should be applied preferably with a nonmetal applicator or suitable glove. If Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is applied with the fingers, the hands should be washed immediately afterward.

Apply cream twice daily in an amount sufficient to cover the lesions. Medication should be continued until the inflammatory response reaches the erosion stage, at which time use of the drug should be terminated. The usual duration of therapy is from 2 to 4 weeks. Complete healing of the lesions may not be evident for 1 to 2 months following cessation of Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream therapy.

Only the 5% strength is recommended. Apply cream twice daily in an amount sufficient to cover the lesions. Treatment should be continued for at least 3 to 6 weeks. Therapy may be required for as long as 10 to 12 weeks before the lesions are obliterated. As in any neoplastic condition, the patient should be followed for a reasonable period of time to determine if a cure has been obtained.

Fluorouracil 5% Topical Cream is available in 40 gm tubes containing 5% fluorouracil (NDC 68682-004-31) in a vanishing cream base consisting of white petrolatum, stearyl alcohol, propylene glycol, polysorbate 60 and parabens (methyl and propyl).

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15°C - 30°C (59°F - 86°F).

Manufactured by: Legacy Pharmaceuticals Puerto Rico, LLC Bo. Mariana Rd 909, KM 1.1 Humacao, PR 00791

Distributed by: Oceanside Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Aliso Viejo, CA 92656 U.S.A.

3360700EX01Rev. October 2007

NDC 68682-004-31Rx Only

Fluorouracil 5%Topical Cream

FOR TOPICAL USE ONLY -NOT FOR OPHTHALMIC, ORAL, OR INTRAVAGINAL USE.

40 g

OCEANSIDE PHARMACEUTICALS

IMAGE fluorouracil-02.jpg

Manufacturer

Oceanside Pharmaceuticals

Active Ingredients

Source

Drugs and Medications [48 Associated Drugs and Medications listed on BioPortfolio]

Fluoroplex [Allergan, Inc.]

FLUOROPLEX (fluorouracil) 1%Topical Cream

Oxaliplatin [Teva Parenterals Medicines, Inc.]

These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Oxaliplatin Injection safely and effectively. See full prescribing information for Oxaliplatin Injection.  Oxaliplatin Injection (Oxa...

Fluorouracil [Taro Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc.]

Fluorouracil Topical Cream USP, 5%

Fluorouracil [Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.]

Fluorouracil Topical Cream USP, 5%

Fluorouracil topical solution usp, 2% and 5% [Taro Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc.]

Fluorouracil Topical Solution USP, 2% and 5%

Clinical Trials [523 Associated Clinical Trials listed on BioPortfolio]

Study of PXD101 Alone and in Combination With 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

This is a study to assess the combination of PXD101 and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)in patients with advanced solid tumors. The primary goal of the study is to understand the safety, anti-tumor a...

Fluorouracil Plus Ethynyluracil in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer That Has Not Responded to Fluorouracil

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Ethynyluracil may help fluorouracil kill more cancer cells by making...

Fluorouracil and Leucovorin and/or Levamisole After Surgery In Treating Patients With Dukes' B Or Dukes' C Colon Cancer

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Leucov...

A Study of Chemoradiotherapy for Intermediate Stage/Selected Stage IV Cancers of the Head and Neck

The primary objective of the study is to evaluate time to progression in eligible patients with cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, paranasal sinuses, and cervical esophagus when t...

Randomized Study on Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Adjuvant Chemo-Immunotherapy in Colon Carcinoma Dukes C

This clinical investigation examined the effectivity 5-fluorouracil, of adding levamisol or interferon to 5-fluorouracil, and of a 5-fluorouracil/levamisol/interferon triple combination, i...

PubMed Articles [178 Associated PubMed Articles listed on BioPortfolio]

5-Fluorouracil affects assembly of stress granules based on RNA incorporation.

The antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil is a widely used chemotherapeutic for the treatment of several solid cancers. However, resistance to 5-fluorouracil remains a major drawback in its clinical use. In t...

Should capecitabine replace 5-fluorouracil in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer?

Fluoropyrimidines play a central role in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Our aim was to review whether capecitabine was a safer, non-inferior, economically superior and more ...

The role of IVS14+1 G > A genotype detection in the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene and pharmacokinetic monitoring of 5-fluorouracil in the individualized adjustment of 5-fluorouracil for patients with local advanced and metastatic colorectal cancer: a preliminary report.

We retrospectively investigated the relationship between IVS14+1 G > A genotype of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) gene with plasma concentration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as well as adverse ...

Inhibition of lettuce seed germination and seedling growth by antimetabolites of nucleic acids, and reversal by nucleic acid precursors and gibberellic acid.

Germination of White Paris lettuce seeds is inhibited by 2-thiouracil up to 24 hours. This inhibition is reversed by RNA precursors only. Seedling growth of lettuce is inhibited by 2-thiouracil and 5-...

A Polymeric Prodrug of 5-Fluorouracil-1-Acetic Acid Using a Multi-Hydroxyl Polyethylene Glycol Derivative as the Drug Carrier.

Macromolecular prodrugs obtained by covalently conjugating small molecular drugs with polymeric carriers were proven to accomplish controlled and sustained release of the therapeutic agents in vitro a...

Search BioPortfolio:
Loading
Advertisement

Relevant Topic

Bioinformatics
Latest News Clinical Trials Research Drugs Reports Corporate
Bioinformatics is the application of computer software and hardware to the management of biological data to create useful information. Computers are used to gather, store, analyze and integrate biological and genetic information which can then be applied...

Advertisement

Drugs and Medication Quicklinks


Searches Linking to this Drug Record