Vitamin B12 absorption judged by measurement of holotranscobalamin, active vitamin B12: evaluation of a commercially available EIA kit.

12:22 EST 26th November 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Vitamin B12 absorption judged by measurement of holotranscobalamin, active vitamin B12: evaluation of a commercially available EIA kit."

Abstract Background: Active vitamin B12 absorption is followed by an increase in holotranscobalamin (holoTC) upon loading with a high physiological dose of the vitamin (the CobaSorb test). This study evaluates the use of a newly launched EIA kit for measurement of holoTC (active B12) in relation to the CobaSorb test. Methods: Intra-assay imprecision and linearity of the EIA kit was examined, employing serum pools of increasing holoTC concentrations. For the CobaSorb test, holoTC was measured before and after loading with 3-times 9 μg of vitamin B12 employing both the in-house ELISA and the EIA kit (n=25). Results: The EIA kit showed an intra-assay CV between 2.2% and 5.8% for holoTC values ranging from 21 to 80 pmol/L. Employing diluted serum samples resulted in spurious high values of holoTC. The EIA kit performed well in relation to the CobaSorb test and classified the patients studied as capable of absorbing vitamin B12 (n=10) or not (n=15), as did the in-house ELISA. Conclusions: The Active B12 (holoTC) EIA kit proved suitable for use with the CobaSorb test, but not for analysis of diluted serum samples.

Affiliation

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine : CCLM / FESCC
ISSN: 1434-6621
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