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Traumatic brain injury and daily life: The role of executive function.

10:35 EDT 19th April 2014 | BioPortfolio

Summary of "Traumatic brain injury and daily life: The role of executive function."

Executive functions are critical in our daily life. People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often have difficulty functioning appropriately in everyday life. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between executive function and functional capacity after TBI. The sample consisted of 43 moderate or severe TBI patients (mean age: 32 years, SD= 13.9). All participants were tested with a battery of executive function measures (Trail Making Test-B, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Letter-Number Sequencing of the WAIS-III, Stroop Color-Word Interference Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test). Patients' everyday functioning was examined with the Patient Competency Rating Scale (PCRS). PCRS was correlated significantly, although moderately, with Trail Making Test-B, Letter-Number Sequencing, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test. These findings suggest that executive function measures used in clinical practice reveal some degree of ecological validity, providing relevant information for predicting daily-life functioning after moderate to severe TBI.

Affiliation

Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona.

Journal Details

This article was published in the following journal.

Name: Psicothema
ISSN: 0214-9915
Pages: 430-435

Links

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Medical and Biotech [MESH] Definitions

Prolonged unconsciousness from which the individual cannot be aroused, associated with traumatic injuries to the BRAIN. This may be defined as unconsciousness persisting for 6 hours or longer. Coma results from injury to both cerebral hemispheres or the RETICULAR FORMATION of the BRAIN STEM. Contributing mechanisms include DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY and BRAIN EDEMA. (From J Neurotrauma 1997 Oct;14(10):699-713)

A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.

Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.

Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)

Bleeding within the brain as a result of penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Traumatically induced hemorrhages may occur in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRUM; BRAIN STEM (see BRAIN STEM HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC); and CEREBELLUM.

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